The Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center is upgrading its printing service and will no longer require cards. The system will now be administered through the campus active directory, allowing users to login with a UT Southwestern username ...

 

Library moves to card-free printing

The Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center is upgrading its printing service and will no longer require cards. The system will now be administered through the campus active directory, allowing users to login with a UT Southwestern username and password.

Additional value can be added 24/7 with a $1, $5, $10, or $20 bill and/or coins at the designated South Campus (main) Library Printing Account Station and Cash Box (E2, Station #1). There are no refunds once funds have been added.

If you wish to pay by personal credit card, IDR or check, please call x82626 (214-648-2626) or visit the Library Administration Office at Bass Center (BL5.500), Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Any balance remaining on a Library Card may be transferred to the new system upon request before January 1, 2018. Please email Charles Robinson with the  information below to request your card balance transfer before the card system is permanently retired.

  • Your full name
  • Library print card number
  • UT Southwestern username
      
 

Library secures award funding for new SLA 3D printer and supplies

CREDIT: Formlabs

The Health Sciences Digital Library and Learning Center was the proud recipient of the 2017 National Network of Libraries of Medicine South Central Region (NNLM.SCR) Technology Award, which went to the purchase of a new Form 2 stereolithography 3D printer, various resins types, and (coming soon) wash and cure stations.

Library 3D printers are available for campus usage to facilitate exploration and support utilization of this innovative technology in research and clinical settings. UT Southwestern affiliates are highly encouraged to complete a Library 3D printer orientation before using the printers.

Files can be printed via a USB connection from a laptop using PreForm software. The printer is currently available by appointment only in Library Administration at Bass Center (BL5.500); it will eventually be moved to the Digital Media Production Studio at the South Campus (main) Library by early 2018.

The resin types currently available for use with the Form 2 are:

  • Black
  • Clear
  • Dental
  • Durable
  • Flexible
  • Grey
  • Tough
  • White

The award was due to the collective efforts of Jane Scott, Desmond Ho, and Jeff Perkins from the Library’s Digital Services and Technology Planning unit.

      
 

Records management and archives management – a match made in heaven

It is an incontrovertible truth that excellent records management contributes greatly to excellent archives management, at least where government, institutional, and corporate records are concerned (perhaps not so much with the personal records of people that are donated to an archives).  Having an established classification scheme is key to locating and retrieving records in an expeditious manner.  In Managing Records: A Handbook of Principles and Practices, Elizabeth Shepherd and Geoffrey Yeo point out that classification schemes should be based on an analysis of the functions, processes, and activities of an organization.  The classification scheme should not be organized by the various business units composing an organization, as similar activities and functions may occur in many of the offices/departments/centers.  Thus, in order to get a complete picture of the activities of an organization, Shepherd and Yeo write, “the systems used to manage the records of those activities should reflect an organization-wide perspective.”[1]  This information is incredibly relevant to the creation of records here at UT Southwestern, as many offices, departments, and centers across campus may be creating the same types of records. As a records management coordinator for an office/department/center on campus, you may wonder “How do I classify these records?” Referencing UT Southwestern’s records retention schedule can be helpful in bringing a defined order to your office records.

Credit: http://www.oit.edu/faculty-staff/resources/archives-records-management

Our records retention schedule is divided into various categories: administrative files, personnel records, fiscal records, etc. Within these categories is a breakdown of the different “records series” which are relevant to a particular category/sub-category. One records series which should be familiar to many faculty and staff here is the “Administrative Correspondence” records series. We all create administrative correspondence throughout the course of our workday. For example, have you sent an email recently providing your thoughts and ideas on a project your department is working on? Have you distributed an inter-office memo that explains a new policy or procedure? That’s administrative correspondence! According to our records retention schedule, administrative correspondence is maintained for four years from the record’s creation. Upon reaching its four-year mark, the administrative correspondence is then destroyed. However, there is an exception to this retention rule, as explained in the schedule. The administrative correspondence of the Office of the President, senior and vice presidents, the Provost’s Office, Legal Counsel, Internal Audit, and other upper Executive Staff members falls under archival review.

What does “archival review” mean? Archival review is the requirement that the UT Southwestern institutional archivist assess the records of the above designated offices/administrative positions to determine if there are any records of long-term historical value. For example, any correspondence related to the planning of Clements University Hospital is of incredible value to our institution’s history and would be selected for the UT Southwestern Archives.

Smart records management ensures that an institution’s history will be well preserved. UT Southwestern’s records retention schedule does an excellent job of noting which records are permanent and thus should be transferred to the Archives. The schedule also clearly defines those records series

[1] Shepherd, Elizabeth and Geoffrey Yeo. Managing Records: A Handbook of Principles and Practices (London: Facet Publishing, 2002) 74.

      
 

What is an archives?

by Catherine Miller, CA, Digital Archivist, UT Southwestern Library

What comes to mind when you hear the word “archives”? Do you immediately picture your email “archive” or an “archive” that you see on a blog site? Or do you think, “Hmmm, archives says to me dust, old stuff, attics, or basements”? Or do you say to yourself, “I have no conception of what that means”? If any of the above is true, then this is an exciting opportunity to introduce you to what an archives is.

To understand what an archives is, it is useful to compare archives and libraries. Indeed, my favorite analogy for explaining the difference between archives and libraries is the following:

“Libraries are to restaurants – AS – Archives are to grocery stores”

When you visit a restaurant, you select a meal from the menu, and the meal is prepared for you: you receive the meal at the restaurant table as a finished product. When you visit a library, you browse the shelves and select a book to read: the book you choose is the synthesized finished product of research from various sources that have been interpreted for you and presented to you in the neatly bound book you hold in your hands. Conversely, when you go to the grocery store, you are getting the raw materials to assemble a meal yourself. For example, the ingredients for an awesome spaghetti dinner include pasta, tomatoes/tomato sauce, onion, green pepper, ground beef, etc. Just as you have to bring together the various materials to make this awesome spaghetti, archives are all about bringing together records from various creators to tell an awesome story. Working in archives, you become the aggregator of information (the cook, so to speak) who is piecing together the records of history so as to tell a story. With archives, you are the interpreter of records, unlike with reading a book, where the information presented has already been interpreted by the author.

Archives contain unique records that a researcher will not find anywhere else. This is a main distinguishing factor between the work of librarians and the work of archivists. Generally, librarians work with published, widely distributed books that you can find in any library.[1] Archivists generally work with non-published materials such as an individual’s personal papers that you will only find at one institution. For example, the UT Southwestern Archives has the records of Dr. Alfred G. Gilman in our Alfred Goodman Gilman Collection. It was donated by Dr. Gilman in December 2012 and contains records which a researcher will only find by visiting the UT Southwestern Archives. The international impact of research is illustrated in one way by the following document that you will only find in the Archives here at UT Southwestern:

Now that you have an idea of what an archives is and how they differ from libraries, here’s a brief introduction to the UT Southwestern Archives. The UT Southwestern Archives is responsible for collecting, processing, preserving, and providing access to the records essential to documenting the administrative, intellectual, and social life of UT Southwestern Medical Center. The Archives is dedicated to documenting:

  1. The mandated functions of UT Southwestern Medical Center and our University Hospitals: education, research, and healthcare delivery
  2. The governance and administration of UT Southwestern Medical Center
  3. The lives of faculty, staff, students, and alumni of UT Southwestern Medical Center
  4. Parkland Memorial Hospital, which has been UT Southwestern’s long-time teaching hospital

The Archives has both institutional records and manuscript collections that contribute to telling the larger story of UT Southwestern’s history. You can learn more about the Archives’ holdings by visiting our webpage. The Archives holds many photographs documenting UT Southwestern’s built environment, research activities, faculty, students, etc. Over 700 of these photos have been digitized and are available to view online in the UT Southwestern Image Archives.

Curious to learn more about the UT Southwestern Archives and about the work that archivists do? Send us your questions at archives@utsouthwestern.edu!

[1] There are exceptions to this rule in the library world, with rare book libraries and special collection libraries being two immediate examples.

      
 

Celebrating National Medical Librarians Month

“The Medical Library Association has declared October as National Medical Librarians Month to raise awareness of the important role of the health information professional,” said Kelly Gonzalez, MSIS, MBA, Assistant Vice President for Library Services. Library staff strive to support UT Southwestern Medical Center’s educational, research, and clinical missions through services, including the:

  • Provision of a comprehensive digital collection of databases and resources
  • Delivery of librarian-mediated searches in response to clinical and research inquiries
  • Education of UT Southwestern Medical Center students, faculty, and staff on how to access/use electronic resources
  • Archiving of the institution’s historical documents, photographs, etc.
  • Collection, preservation, and distribution of UTSW electronic theses, dissertations, and archives in its institutional repository

For more information or to schedule training with a health sciences librarian, please contact us by completing the Ask Us form or call 214-648-2001.

      
 

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