As a native Northwesterner, I am well versed in the culture of rain. When the days of endless drizzle get to be too much, we imagine we have webbed feet, put on a raincoat, and try to pretend we don't mind. Often, when the moisture is heavy, I've heard ...

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"Painting Small Impressions" - 5 new articles

  1. Nice Day for Ducks
  2. Getting Ready for Snow
  3. Painting Process
  4. Mountains and Coast
  5. Encaustic Journey
  6. More Recent Articles

Nice Day for Ducks


As a native Northwesterner, I am well versed in the culture of rain. When the days of endless drizzle get to be too much, we imagine we have webbed feet, put on a raincoat, and try to pretend we don't mind. Often, when the moisture is heavy, I've heard people comment that it is, "a nice day for ducks." With this in mind, I had a fun afternoon last week painting some little web footed creatures. This is one of my favorites. I placed this fellow on a sunny bank, gave him a shadow, and tried to imagine a little warm weather. In my world, it was definitely a nice day for ducks. The little painting was created with oil paints on a small 4x6 canvas panel. He's for sale in my Etsy Shop where I will be listing the rest of his friends as soon as the paint is dry.
    

Getting Ready for Snow


This week I've been doing some more small studies, auditioning my ideas for something larger. Both of these paintings were inspired by a series of photographs I took while on a snowshoeing adventure in the Cascade Mountains of Washington State last winter. Both are oil paintings, the top one 8x10 and the smaller one 6x6. I have some canvases that are 24x30 and 30x30 that need to be covered with paint, so these little ones might go big, or might stay small. Undecided at this point.

You can find my original work at Smallimpressions and at Ugallery, or click on any of the links to the right.
    

Painting Process




It feels good to be back in my studio after several months of travelling. Although my paint brush was still, I continued to store up ideas for future projects. The first step in my painting process is to take numerous photographs, store memories, and think. After I am back in the studio, I spend time reminiscing and reviewing. Exploration of different scenes follows. These two little paintings, size 6x8 and 8x8 are explorations of the same scene on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State. I couldn't decide whether a square format or a landscape format would serve the scene best, so I painted both with the idea of creating a larger version. I eventually sell the smaller studies here and the larger versions here. The decision on format is still percolating, but completing this exercise has help me draw some conclusions. What do you think? Square format or landscape? 

    

Mountains and Coast

Hurricane Hill
8x8 Oil on Canvas

Salt Creek
8x8 Oil on Canvas

Last month I had the pleasure of visiting the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State with a group of friends. We ventured from the Strait of Juan de Fuca to Hurricane Ridge and hiked along the sea and in the mountains all within one day. I arrived home with lots of inspiration for painting the lovely landscapes of the area. A series of 8x8 square format landscapes emerged after the trek. The two paintings above are my favorites. The rest can be viewed here in my portfolio. As the paint dries I will be selling the originals in my Etsy Shop and perhaps doing some larger versions to submit to my Ugallery portfolio
    

Encaustic Journey

Red and Black 1
6x6 Encaustic

Always eager to experiment with new art mediums, encaustic painting is a method with which I had no experience until recently. The ethereal sense that the process produces has long intrigued me, so I finally did some research, bought some supplies, and jumped in. Encaustic is a classic form of art that uses bee's wax and heat to produce a design.  Above is one of my first paintings using the process. I am delighted to report that it was fun and not nearly as difficult as I imagined. I'm sure I will continue to play with the process. Below are two more compositions from my exploration. I hope you like them.

Red and Black 2
6x6 Encaustic

Red and Black 3
6x6 Encaustic
    

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