Black people have experienced discrimination in the workplace for centuries. America has long made an attempt to isolate, degrade and silence our voices in the workplace. LinkedIn recently released data that sheds light on the challenges Black ...
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"Très Chic Style " - 5 new articles

  1. In Chic Culture: New Study Shows That Nearly Half Of Black Professionals Have Faced Blatant Discrimination At Work
  2. In Chic Entertainment: “The Best Man: Final Chapters” Set To Debut On Peacock
  3. Honoring a Legend: Cicely Tyson... A Life In Fashion
  4. In Chic Beauty: Skin Care 101- Answers Here
  5. In Chic Fashion: A Chic History Of Fur & The Significance For Black Women
  6. More Recent Articles

In Chic Culture: New Study Shows That Nearly Half Of Black Professionals Have Faced Blatant Discrimination At Work


Black people have experienced discrimination in the workplace for centuries. America has long made an attempt to isolate, degrade and silence our voices in the workplace. LinkedIn recently released data that sheds light on the challenges Black professionals face in the work environment. 

The Study Includes: 

  • The prevalence of discrimination
  • Being overlooked for advancement
  • The importance of mentorship
  • The actions companies must take to advance the careers of Black professionals
The results of the study is shameful yet not surprising as on any given day chatting with fellow black women, discrimination is always a prevalent discussion when discussing workplace politics. The results found that 56% of Black professionals ages 18-34 have faced blatant discriminations and microaggressions at work. 

In a statement by Rosanna Durruthy, LinkedIn's Global VP of Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging stated "Linked In's new research helps shine a light on the challenge and experiences of Black professionals in the workplace"

Durruthy even went as far as to share the general pattern that has evoked the feeling of discrimination: 
  • Black people have a harder and worse experience at work than almost everyone else.
  • 34% felt that they've been overlooked or intentionally passed by for career advancement opportunities as a result of their race.
  • 25% feel they may face retaliation for speaking up about justice issues or topics around diversity, equity and inclusion in the workplace. 
In an effort to discuss these issues LinkedIn has launched a Black History Month series entitled, "Conversations For Change". The series culminates an ongoing dialogue of discussions on the topics of intersection of life and work. Film and television magnate Tyler Perry serves as the Guest Editor for the series and curates a week of programming across LinkedIn News along with award-winning journalist Gayle King. 

While we applaud LinkedIn for shedding light on a constant issue we face as Black people, we believe this needs to be an ongoing conversation beyond the month of February. As a college educated black woman holding TWO degrees I can easily list the times I was made to feel less than worthy by white counterparts less qualified than me. From my time at Morgan Stanley on the trading floor to Henderson, Nevada based children's shoe designer Pediped, I  have countless stories that warranted a legal suit for racial discrimination. 

My journey led me to entrepreneurship early on in my career. As a business owner residing and working in the South racism rears it's ugly head on a daily basis. My owning a lucrative Public Relations firm, possessing two offices and driving a Mercedes has often led to some interesting conversations and discussion to say the least. From questioning my business practices to being asked, "How many fur coats do I own"? 

America's problems with race affect every sense of being for Black people. This Black History month and every month moving forward I will begin to utilize my voice and my platform to amplify the voices, struggles, plights and celebratory moments of my people. American history has proven this is not the time to be quiet nor the time to "Sit This One Out". 

Stay tuned for my weekly posts... "In Chic Culture" dedicated to The Movement, The Moments and My Stories. 


    

In Chic Entertainment: “The Best Man: Final Chapters” Set To Debut On Peacock

Malcolm Lee promised us it wouldn't be another 14 years for the third installment of his cult classic "The Best Man". Malcom D. Lee and the cast of "The Best Man" film franchise is reuniting for a limited 10 series run that will debut on Peacock.

"The Best Man: Final Chapters" will feature returning cast members Morris Chestnut, Melissa De Sousa, Taye Diggs, Regina Hall, Terrence Howard, Sanaa Lathan, Nia Long, and Harold Perrineau. Malcolm D. Lee and Dayna Lynne North will write and executive produce as we journey through the final chapters of the college friends. 

"The Best Man" franchise is the epitome of Black love and friendship. It delivered us an in depth look at the complexities college educated Black individuals face juggling career and relationships. From harboring secrets to figuring it all out while supporting friends you love, "The Best Man" has been ALL that and then some for Black women & a few men too. 

No official word on premiere dates but we I promise to keep you fabulous ones notified. This may possibly be the BEST news we've received all year!

    

Honoring a Legend: Cicely Tyson... A Life In Fashion


96 Years... An icon, influencer, activist and STYLE icon has departed this world today.

Cicely Tyson was the epitome of style & grandeur well into her 90's. Her fearless fashion reminded us with every stride & glide that she was royalty. 

Sharing a few of my fave photos of the screen legend and always reminded of the significance she plays in today's fashion world. 

Rest Well Queen... 










    

In Chic Beauty: Skin Care 101- Answers Here

With the pandemic looming over our heads.. (seems like forever), it's the perfect time to indulge in a lil' self care. I indulge in self care every darn chance I get. Whether it's devouring my fave snack (chocolate ganache cake), partaking in a at home mani-pedi session or sashaying into Sephora and exhaling all the stresses of the world... I am so IN!

Treating yourself to a great skin care regimen isn't only self care - its is necessary! I'm always asked if I utilize filters on my 7,000+ Instagram posts or if I airbrush my professional head shots. The answers are No & No. I wasn't blessed with amazing skin. I suffered from acne break outs and hyper-pigmentation issues just like most women. The difference is I learned what works for my skin and what makes it GLOW!

Continue reading as I share my fave skin care go-to's....


Getting To The Surface: Cleansers, Scrubs & Peels I Adore...

    

In Chic Fashion: A Chic History Of Fur & The Significance For Black Women

There's a long history regarding black women and the fur industry. Often seen as a symbol of elegance and grandeur, fur played a significant role in the lives of many women - black women in particular. 

My personal love affair with fur began as a child in church watching the elders arrive clad in full length furs and matching hats. I can remember my paternal grandmother donning pillbox style mink hats and even having one stolen off her head one morning en route to church in Brooklyn.

Furs were coveted items in the black community and many saved for years to purchase one. Whether it was a stole, custom capelet or the natural floor length ranch mahogany mink style. Black celebrities also solidified the idea that furs were an "I made it moment". Diana Ross & The Supremes were always photographed in gorgeous fur looks, along with Marian Anderson and Billie Holiday to name a few. 

The Supremes arriving to a tour stop clad in fur.

Fur has long been the debate with animal activist and spearheaded by PETA, whom once referred to themselves as the "PR for animals". I was wearing fur during the days of being afraid to walk into Manhattan for fear of your coat being splashed with red paint. Activist were ruthless and aggressive during the early to late 90's in New York City. They would camp out in front of Saks, Bloomindales and other high-end department stores and harass women in fur coats. 


Fur has long been the debate with animal activist and spearheaded by PETA, whom once referred to themselves as the "PR for animals". I was wearing fur during the days of being afraid to walk into Manhattan for fear of your coat being splashed with red paint. Activist were ruthless and aggressive during the early to late 90's in New York City. They would camp out in front of Saks, Bloomindales and other high-end department stores and harass women in fur coats. 


What perplexes me the most is the insistence that wearing fur is inhumane, yet these same "lovers of humanity" are radio silent when black people are murdered in the street as a result of just being black. When PETA made the decision years ago to shame Aretha Franklin in an open letter regarding her love of fur, it was less than humane. The letter ridiculed her weight and mentioned "she looked like a clown". In true Aretha style, she never responded and continued to wear floor length sweeping fur designs at events. 

I can still remember being gifted my first fur on my 14th birthday by my Godmother Catherine. She was the epitome of black elegance and shared her penchant for style with me every chance she got. 25+ years later I still have the cinched waist blonde mink jacket in my winter rotation. It's special, it has an emotional meaning to me and will forever be one of my favorites.

In a way, passing down a fur coat is a modest gesture to prophesize a life of opulence and grandeur for a younger woman, said Tanisha C. Ford, an associate professor of Africana Studies and History at the University of Delaware and author of "Dressed in Dreams," a book that explores the politics of black fashion.

Fur has become a hot topic and debate for many in recent years with cities in California (Los Angeles & San Francisco) now banning the sale and New York attempting to follow suit. 

Wearing fur has now been considered unethical and politically incorrect within the fashion landscape. When top fashion designers like Gucci, Stella McCartney and Chanel made the decision to halt the use of real fur in their designs it sent a message to the industry and the fall out has led to a 50% decline in sales. 

Not everyone believes that the decline in the fur industry was the result of PETA and it's relentless attempt to shame fur lovers. I firmly believe race played an integral role in this new "awakening" and few are even comfortable to admit it. 

White women have been purveyors of fur for decades. Often seen as a rite of passage or introduction to high society. Furs were gifted for weddings, purchased by husband's and handed down for generations. It wasn't until black women began to purchase furs that it became an "issue". Black women were in financial positions to afford the same luxury items as white women and even doing so without husband's.

Paula Marie Seniors, a historian and professor of Africana studies at Virginia Tech, recalls her mother saying, "As soon as black women could afford to buy mink coats, white society and white women said fur was all wrong, verboten, passé."

To date I own about a dozen fur coats, ranging from full lengths, jackets, stoles, and a custom piece from Ketchikan, Alaska I gifted myself after a 3 month stay during a contractual opportunity in 2019. I financed my first fur purchase. A mahogany ranch mink with my initials and my signature "Tres Chic Style" embroidered in the lining. I was in my 20's, single with TWO babies and I was buying a mink. My family thought I was crazy and secretly envied my purchase AND my decision to do what I wanted with my money. 

Living in different regions of the country (as I have) you're met with varying experiences wearing your fur. As a black woman in Tennessee, my experiences have taken on a new meaning of "They Mad". I'm often met with stares, whispers of "Who does she think she is? ", the occasional eye roll to random conversations deeply rooted in racism and reminders that "they have one too at home".  I can even recall being at a media event when I lived in Vegas and questioned by a 80 year old Jewish woman who loudly and boldly asked "I didn't know Negroes wore fur".

My plans are to begin gifting my daughter some of my coats while instilling the rich tradition and history that was passed down to me by my Godmother. And yes... I plan to purchase more coats, (new & vintage) while sashaying all up and through Walmart, The Dollar Tree and anywhere else I damn well please. This "Negro" (as I was referred to) made a decision to wear, appreciate and love my furs and all it's opulent and passé grandeur.

    

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