Now Available In this efficiently made, swiftly paced new thriller from award-winning Canadian filmmaker Christian Sparkes, one impulsively bad decision begets another when Chris Davis (Mark O'Brien) tries and fails to execute a double-cross in a drug ...
‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ 

Click here to read this mailing online.

Your email updates, powered by FeedBlitz

 
Here is a sample subscription for you. Click here to start your FREE subscription


  1. Movie Review: Hammer (2019)
  2. Movie Review: End of Sentence (2019)
  3. Movie Review: The Trip to Greece (2020)
  4. Warner Archive Collection Blu-ray Review: Blood on the Moon (1948)
  5. Warner Archive Collection Blu-ray Review: Tin Cup (1996)
  6. More Recent Articles

Movie Review: Hammer (2019)




Now Available



In this efficiently made, swiftly paced new thriller from award-winning Canadian filmmaker Christian Sparkes, one impulsively bad decision begets another when Chris Davis (Mark O'Brien) tries and fails to execute a double-cross in a drug deal gone terribly wrong.

Grabbing a dirt bike from the scene when he's caught in the crosshairs of a gun, Chris barely escapes with his life before he's caught once again. Luckily, it's not by the dealer (Ben Cotton) this time but rather his estranged father Stephen (Will Patton) who happens to see Chris fleeing from the scene of the crime when he's stopped in traffic in the crossroads of his small Canadian border town and hits his own gas pedal in response. 


He soon catches up to Chris, whom we discover in a key line of dialogue had been forced out of his family's lives when he'd gotten in trouble for this sort of thing before. But when Stephen sees the panic in his son's eyes and the blood on his sleeve, he puts all of his preconceived notions of right and wrong out of his mind and offers his help.

Introducing us to the first of the three other members of the Davis family who will be ensnared in this debacle to varying degrees by the time the film is over, Hammer uses the universal theme of the blood ties that bind to transcend what might otherwise have been a narrative derived solely from first-person films noir. 

Fusing the drama together with a light dose of symbolism as well as raising questions of moral responsibility toward not only parents to their children but children to their parents as well, Hammer serves as a clever reminder that crime rarely impacts one person alone but instead affects every individual that person loves. The impetus for the film overall, in his sophomore effort and follow-up to his multi-award-winning feature debut Cast No Shadow, Sparkes intentionally set out to challenge "perceptions of who criminals are and where they come from." 


Wisely setting Hammer in the suburbs and focusing on an entire family (as opposed to only the criminal upon whom most genre films tend to fixate), together with its economical storytelling, this approach places us right inside the car alongside Stephen and Chris as they barrel down the road towards danger and the unknown for the rest of the movie's lean eighty-two minute running time. 

Although in need of a bit more closure and perhaps, one more hurdle to bring the rest of the family – especially the mother (played by Vickie Papavs) – more effectively into the proceedings than the last act offers, Hammer is still an impressively tense nerve-jangler overall. Benefiting from its dynamic cast, the film is bolstered in particular by its two leads, namely Mark O'Brien who first caught my attention in AMC's acclaimed word-of-mouth hit series Halt and Catch Fire, and veteran character actor Will Patton who's been stealing scenes since the 1980s. 

Released in Canada in 2019 and newly unveiled for rent on VOD in the states this week, in Hammer, Christian Sparkes proves once again that you don't need a big budget or special effects to catch viewers in the crosshairs of inventive character-driven suspense.


Text ©2020, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reservedhttps://www.filmintuition.com  Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  Also, as an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases made off my site through ad links. FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.
 
    

Movie Review: End of Sentence (2019)




Now Available



After a prison guard informs him that murderers make the best inmates because they smile and do what they're told, soft-spoken Frank Fogle (John Hawkes) asks him if the same is true for thieves. Common thieves, the guard explains, are the worst kind of prisoners because they don't want to listen or do what they're told. It's a sentiment that seems to strike a chord with Frank, who you can see try to find a silver lining in the storm clouds passing through his eyes from the exchange after the guard tells him that a good job is the key to reintegration . . . just before he admits that for ex-cons, finding work is almost impossible.

Having taken his terminally ill wife to say goodbye to their twenty-eight-year-old son Sean (Logan Lerman), an inmate doing a bid for automobile theft, after his wife passes away, Frank returns to the Alabama correctional facility to pick him up when he's released. There to follow through on an offscreen promise he made to his wife on her deathbed to bring her ashes to northern Ireland to be sprinkled in a lake, when the stubborn Sean first sets eyes on his father, all Frank represents to him is just another guard telling him what to do. Barely willing to acknowledge his father, let alone get in a car with him, it's clear that Sean prefers the company of strangers to his old man. Accepting a ride from a police officer to a job interview that proves unsuccessful, Sean holds out as long as he can before he gives up on hitchhiking and steps inside his dad's car at last.

Needing to be in Oakland, California in five days to accept a position in an electronics warehouse that will be given away if he doesn't arrive, Sean strikes a deal with his father. He tells Frank that he'll go with him to Ireland, help sprinkle his beloved mother's ashes, and look at a piece of property that both men have just discovered she'd inherited (which Frank has promised to give to him), if his father vows to fly him out to his new life on the west coast on Frank's dime when they're finished.

A situation that pushes both men outside of their comfort zones, as not only are the two estranged but his father is terrified of flying, it doesn't take long before Sean looks for a buffer — any buffer — to make the trip a little more bearable, which he finds in the beautiful Jewel (Sarah Bolger), a mysterious Irish lass with a troubled past. After the two flirt and frolic, Sean helps her scheme her way into a ride from Frank as they make their way from Dublin to his mother's final destination up north, not realizing that his father has found a buffer of his own when he sets out to learn more about his late wife's life.

 
Using a classical journey motif to double as the path these two men need to take to learn more about one another (only to eventually uncover that they have much more in common than they'd realized), in his feature filmmaking debut, director Elfar Adalsteins begins subtly linking his characters together in their literal and figurative prisons of grief from the very start of End of Sentence.

Isolated in their respective frames, with Frank struggling to go through the motions of eating and sleep after his wife's death and Sean alone in his cell or answering a call from his father in a lonely Taxi Driverish prison hallway before he hangs up without a word, Adalsteins' approach is as beautifully understated as it is highly effective. Working with both his cinematographer Karl Oskarsson in terms of blocking as well as his trio of editors Guðlaugur Andri Eythórsson, Kristján Lodmfjord, and Valdís Óskarsdóttir to keep the men separated often in cuts and frames, when they're in the same shot together early on, Adalsteins' Sentence gives off the impression that it might actually be painful for the Fogles to look one another in the eye.

And even though we absolutely know where the film is headed in terms of their relationship — owing as much to a deft screenplay by Beautiful Boy writer Michael Armbruster as it does its talented leads — for a majority of its running time, the compelling Icelandic, Irish, and American co-production refuses to take any shortcuts. In fact, it only opts for a slightly contrived twist at the precise moment that the film needs it most when, after the years of resentment that Sean has been building up towards his father erupts in a volcanic but necessary confrontation, the film gives the two men a fresh reset as they're pushed to tackle a problem from the same temporarily united side. And it's a tremendous credit to the work done here by Hawkes and Lerman that it works better than it might've perhaps had Sean and Frank been embodied by two lesser actors. 

Though Lerman has the advantage of voicing his frustrations aloud, Hawkes (who first caught my attention in Winter's Bone) turns in a phenomenal performance as a quietly dignified, beaten down, but still polite man searching as much for the truth as he is the ability to feel anything other than the devastating loss. Revealing an important truth about Frank in a heartbreaking payoff to an earlier scene that Adalsteins opts to convey without words (which suddenly makes you look at everything he'd done in the film thus far in a new light), it soon becomes apparent just how nuanced Hawkes' portrayal of Frank has been all along.

A subtly potent and moving work that was shot in 2017 and released to VOD now in 2020, End of Sentence is one of those universally relatable films that addresses the emotional rift that can exist between not only father and son but any two people who grew up in the same house together. Unable to see past his own anger at the man he most likely views as his very first warden, it's only when the two leave the confines of their separate and isolated lives in the United States that Sean realizes that his father might understand his rage better than he does.

With his hunched shoulders and meek manner, while Sean itches to escape his present situation the quickest way he knows how (and whether or not his problems will follow), Frank accepts his fate. Resigned to the past and uncertain how to make sense of a solitary future, with a shy, compliant smile, John Hawkes keeps his head down and tries to survive like the rest of us . . . until eventually he's forced to look up.


Text ©2020, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reservedhttps://www.filmintuition.com  Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  Also, as an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases made off my site through ad links. FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.
 
    

Movie Review: The Trip to Greece (2020)


Now Playing




First things first: Steve Coogan is okay. Last seen facing a cryptic and uncertain fate in North Africa at the end of the quixotic Trip to Spain, Coogan is alive and well and ready to impression battle another day with his offscreen friend/onscreen frenemy Rob Brydon in the fourth and final installment of director Michael Winterbottom's series, The Trip to Greece.

By design, of course, the structure remains the same. In each new eye-candy filled Trip, we watch in envy as the two actors indulge in six mouthwatering meals which take place in six out-of-this-world locations under the guise that they plan to write a book or article about their experience. However, as first evidenced saw in Winterbottom's brilliant sophomore entry The Trip to Italy and again in Spain and now Greece, the works are as singular as they are familiar.

Airing first in the UK as a miniseries before each venture is chopped down into the length of a film for distribution, the Trip titles, which pay tribute to the arts and culture synonymous with each setting, are much more than just picturesque travelogues for foodies.


Modeled on Homer's The Odyssey, just like its eponymous hero Odysseus took ten years to return home, The Trip to Greece finds precisely the right note upon which to end the series, especially given that — having started in 2010 — it's taken the screen exaggerated versions of Coogan and Brydon ten years to put away their suitcases and head home as well.

Cramming Odysseus' ten year journey into their six day trip from Troy to Ithaca, Greece layers in the dramatic themes of Homer's work — particularly with regard to mortality and a son's search for his father — into the film's otherwise, irresistibly funny trademark banter. Punctuated by many of the impressions we've seen in earlier entries as well as some wildly creative new material — Barry Gibb joins the party, Coogan and Brydon engage in dueling Dustin Hoffmans, and they fantasy cast Ray Winstone into Shakespeare — it's a great way to build on old gags while also giving us just enough surprises to ensure it isn't a straight up repeat.

Forever making me wonder just how on Earth anyone dining nearby doesn't immediately crack-up as they go from competitively trying to one-up the other man's impression to engaging in a friendly swim race since they are in the land that gave us the Olympics after all, Greece is as winning as it is thoughtful. And much like the other installments in the series, which has drawn worthwhile comparisons to Richard Linklater's Before trilogy starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy, viewers hovering around middle age will unquestioningly relate to the topics and themes touched on throughout.


Gorgeously shot by veteran Trip lensman James Clarke, Greece is filled once again with the music of longtime Winterbottom collaborator Michael Nyman, whose introspective piano music from the original has become one of the series' richest motifs.

As a genuine fan, admittedly, I'm with Coogan and Brydon in hoping that one of my favorite film franchises will be revived in another decade or so (which kind of adheres to Before's schedule). However, if this is indeed the last hurrah, as series mastermind Michael Winterbottom believes it to be then — trapped halfway between comedy and tragedy, with both life and The Trip's Odyssey coming full circle — it's ending exactly the way it should. For whatever happens, this time you know that Coogan and Brydon will be okay and more than that, we're all the richer for having ventured along.


Text ©2020, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reservedhttps://www.filmintuition.com  Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  Also, as an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases made off my site through ad links. FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.
 
    

Warner Archive Collection Blu-ray Review: Blood on the Moon (1948)


Now Available




A stylized western that — with its shadowy cinematography from Out of the Past lensman Nicholas Musuaraca — has much more in common with Film Noir than the genre best epitomized by other 1948 releases Red River and Fort Apache, director Robert Wise's distaste for the western and determination to infuse his feature with gritty realism helps his unique Blood on the Moon straddle both worlds. A minor effort when compared to River and Apache by Howard Hawks and John Ford respectively, the largely forgotten Blood is given new life in this gorgeously crisp Blu-ray debut from Warner Archive, which arrives alongside another 1948 Robert Mitchum western, Rachel and the Stranger.

No stranger to Film Noir, including two shot by Musuaraca (Out of the Past and The Locket), the masculine complexity of the ego, id, and superego contained in the aura of Mitchum as soon as he enters the frame lends itself incredibly well to the existential side of the genre, which is pushed to the forefront of Moon. As Robert Wise recalls in the Robert Mitchum biography Baby, I Don't Care, this belief was also shared by Blood on the Moon star Walter Brennan, who Wise describes pointing a finger at the smoldering Mitchum on set and saying to friends, "that is the goddamndest realest cowboy I've ever seen."

Caught between two sides in a battle over land and cattle, after drifter turned hired gun Jim Garry (Mitchum) is enlisted to help his old trail driving partner Tate Riling (Robert Preston) in his war with rancher John Lufton (Tom Tully), he realizes he's been tricked into being a villain rather than a hero. Manipulating the ongoing battle between Lufton and local homesteaders, who foolishly believe that Riling is helping them in order to stand up for the underdog rather than just to position himself for power and glory, Blood on the Moon's warnings about the motives of aspiring leaders makes this film timelier than ever with its post-2016 release in an election year.


A house divided by loyalties in the form of Lufton's two daughters whom we discover have each pledged allegiance to a different side, after Mitchum gets involved with Barbara Bel Geddes — whom he first meets and flirts with by gunfire in a bananas sequence that uses a trick-shooting standoff as foreplay — he starts to reevaluate his position.

Adapted from the Luke Short novel Gunman's Chance by former script editor turned prolific Hollywood screenwriter Lillie Hayward, although there's nothing terribly original about the moral quandary laced narrative faced by Mitchum's Jim Garry on the page, Wise leans into the ambiguity heavily and turns this into a black, white, and shadowy tale of good and evil. Augmented by not only some bravura shootouts and stampedes but especially by its well-choreographed fight scenes, which foreshadow Wise's brilliant work directing West Side Story and The Sound of Music, although the former Orson Welles editor had helmed other pictures, you can tell how much the film he described as his "first big feature" meant to him when we watch Mitchum and Preston go ten rounds.

Not wanting "one of those extremely staged-looking fistfights used in all the movies where the stuntmen did this elaborate acrobatic fighting and you saw the real actors only in close-ups," he vowed to deliver a scene "with that awkward brutal look of a real fight," where "when it was done . . . the winner . . . [should] look as exhausted as the loser." Recalling Mitchum's excitement about the brawl, again in Baby, I Don't Care, Wise remarked that his leading man “probably knew more than I did about barroom fights like this one.” And while 1948 is a notorious year in Mitchum's life because incredibly, this film and Rachel and the Stranger did big business at the box office after his arrest and brief jail sentence for marijuana use, the films' success undoubtedly helped land him more roles in the genre he slipped into as naturally as a second skin.

A critical hit which scored well-earned raves from Variety and The New York Times, Blood on the Moon's unusually noirish approach to a western showed once again the amount of range exuded by its director. At the same time, of course, it also paints one fascinating portrait of Mitchum, reminding us that no matter what genre we see him in, he's always the most interesting thing onscreen, waging a battle over right and wrong that seems to flash in his eyes as one of "the goddamndest realest" complicated cinematic protagonists we've ever seen.


Text ©2020, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reservedhttps://www.filmintuition.com  Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  Also, as an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases made off my site through ad links. FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.
    

Warner Archive Collection Blu-ray Review: Tin Cup (1996)


Now Available




The way that driving range pro Roy McAvoy (Kevin Costner) sees it, all you need to win a game of golf is a trusty 7 iron — although a rake, a shovel, or a baseball bat will work in a pinch — and a dogged Don Quixote-like belief that when life hands you a defining moment, you define the moment or it defines you. And to Roy, there's no moment more loaded with existential questioning than when you're 230 yards away from the tee and the only thing standing in your way is a small body of water. Do you lay up or do you "grip it and rip it?"

Relying on instinct and adrenaline, most of the time he doesn't hesitate to grab his trusty 7 iron and "let the big dog eat," but after he meets and falls for beautiful "doctor lady" Molly Griswold (played by Rene Russo), he vows to prove to her that he isn't just a small time golf jock. Second-guessing his need to always put pride ahead of logic, especially when he discovers that her boyfriend is none other than his old college tour partner, the phony, smooth-as-silk professional golfer David Simms (Don Johnson), he sets off on a quest to win the U.S. Open, kick her boyfriend's ass, and of course, get the girl.


Reuniting with his magnetic Bull Durham star Kevin Costner at the height of the actor's fame as an internationally successful movie star in the 1990s following the The Bodyguard and Dances With Wolves, writer-director Ron Shelton's Tin Cup is much more than just the golf version of the now-contemporary classic comedy that launched his career.

Lighter and even more laid-back, while Bull Durham is perhaps the most intricate and sophisticated sports themed romcom in Shelton's filmography, this one gives us a chance to see Costner's goofy side as a man perhaps halfway between his in-control character in Durham and the one played by Tim Robbins, who was the exact opposite.

As articulate and highly verbal as ever, however, which gives Costner the chance to deliver some epic speeches penned by Shelton and his co-writer John Norville, what Roy McAvoy lacks in formal education, he makes up for with his honesty and earnestness in telling whomever is listening exactly what's on his mind at all times. Obviously unfamiliar with the concept of having a filter, whether he's telling Molly — who he first meets when she takes lessons at his driving range — to just give in and listen to that tuning fork that goes off in her loins or telling off David Simms when he caddies for him in a position that's short lived, Roy has no interest in playing anything safe.


Using sports as a metaphor for life, especially when it comes to dealing with the opposite sex or deciding what a certain golf shot says about him deep down, he and Molly make a tentative agreement to trade services, with him offering golf lessons in exchange for her help as a head doctor. Joining his best friend, trusty caddy, and swing doctor Romeo (a wonderful Cheech Marin) on the road as he wins one tournament after another to qualify for the Open, the two try to help Roy confront whatever it is about him that just refuses to play conservatively when there's an opportunity to assert his greatness.

Another fascinating look at gender and (especially) the competitiveness of straight men, both in terms of their athletic skill as well as when it comes to pursuing and possessing a member of the opposite sex, if you watch this film after Shelton's Bull Durham and White Men Can't Jump, these themes hit you as hard as a 7 iron to the head. Begging to be explored in greater detail, especially as part of an overall inventory that spans the rest of the sports-centric titles of Shelton's entire filmography, much like Sofia Coppola is drawn to the period in a girl's life when she comes into her own as a self-possessed woman, Shelton's dedication to the pride and pitfalls of athletic heterosexual American males is truly captivating.

And nobody brings these affably conflicted men to life quite like Kevin Costner, who trained with former professional golfer Gary McCord to play the game well enough that a majority of the swings and shots he makes onscreen are ones legitimately hit by Costner. The inspiration for the film's gut-wrenching — so painful it's funny — climactic golf sequence where Roy must decide once and for all just which shot to take and how that translates to the man he wants to be, Costner learned so much from McCord for his Golden Globe and New York Film Critics Circle nominated performance that he wrote the forward to McCord's book Golf For Dummies.


A true movie star turn in that it's filled with pathos and more going on just below the surface, even when the film's scenes threaten to be a little sitcomish, Costner leads by example and Tin Cup's terrific ensemble cast — well-balanced by Don Johnson as the anti-Roy — helps center Shelton's chaotic world overall.

Additionally known for writing some extraordinarily complex roles for his leading ladies, which — punctuated by the Preston Sturges like screwball rhythm of his dialogue — are often daffy but wise, Rene Russo's scene-stealing portrayal of Molly marks Ron Shelton's last great female character, and a worthy successor to Susan Sarandon in Bull Durham and Rosie Perez in White Men Can't Jump.

As much fun to watch on its own as it is back-to-back-to-back with a few other Shelton works, the 1996 romcom has recently been given a sharp, sunshine bright transfer to Blu-ray from Warner Archive at long last and for longtime fans, the difference in picture and sound is immediately apparent. From the witty country twang of the great singer-songwriter tunes on the soundtrack that play like a southwestern Greek chorus for our West Texas driving range pro to the discernible thwack of a club soaring through the wind on its way to connect with a ball that shoots out of one's back speakers, the impact of the sound easily matches the clarity of the Blu-ray image.

Don Quixote on the eighteenth hole of life in deciding what he wants to do as well as how to play the game, much like Roy McAvoy, Tin Cup digs in and doesn't let go until we're completely won over by its audacity, brashness, and charm.


Text ©2020, Film Intuition, LLC; All Rights Reservedhttps://www.filmintuition.com  Unauthorized Reproduction or Publication Elsewhere is Strictly Prohibited and in violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.  Also, as an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases made off my site through ad links. FTC Disclosure: Per standard professional practice, I may have received a review copy or screener link of this title in order to voluntarily decide to evaluate it for my readers, which had no impact whatsoever on whether or not it received a favorable or unfavorable critique. Cookies Notice: This site incorporates tools (including advertiser partners and widgets) that use cookies and may collect some personal information in order to display ads tailored to you etc. Please be advised that neither Film Intuition nor its site owner has any access to this data beyond general site statistics (geographical region etc.) as your privacy is our main concern.
    

More Recent Articles


You Might Like

Safely Unsubscribe ArchivesPreferencesContactSubscribePrivacy