This fanciful Temagami vintage postcard dates from 1926 and is an example of a tall tale, or exaggeration, postcard. Tall tale or exaggeration postcards often feature improbably sized crops, or fishing or hunting scenes.

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  1. Tall Tale, or Exaggeration Postcard from Temagami, Ontario
  2. Baseball Postcard from Gresham, Oregon
  3. A Grand Rapids, Michigan Vintage Postcard
  4. Sandra Ann Motel in Jacksonville, Florida
  5. Buffalo Bill Cody and the Wild West
  6. More Recent Articles

Tall Tale, or Exaggeration Postcard from Temagami, Ontario

Temagami, Ontario Example of Tall Tale, or Exaggeration, Vintage Postcard

This fanciful Temagami vintage postcard dates from 1926 and is a good example of a tall tale, or exaggeration, postcard. Tall tale or exaggeration postcards often feature improbably sized crops, or fishing or hunting scenes with over-sized fish and wildlife. The improbably sized fish seen in this 1926 real-photo postcard is so huge that a man holds reins to steer it.

Tall Tale, or Exaggeration, Postcard by William H. Martin, 1908

An explanation of the photographic process used to make these “tall tale” postcards (through manipulation of negatives), as they are also known, can be found at the Wisconsin Historical Society’s web page about photographer Alfred Stanley Johnson and at the American Museum of Photography’s page on “trick” photographer William H. Martin. Both Johnson and Martin were well-known for their “tall tale” postcards; a 1908 example of Martin’s work captioned “A Pumpkin of ‘Powerful’ Growth” can be seen above. It’s an Azo Tri 1 real-photo postcard, and was published by his Martin Post Card Co.


Browse our novelty postcards page to see more examples of this genre. Thousands of vintage postcards can be accessed via the search box on the home page of VintagePostcards.org. Or, unwind in the world’s largest postcard bookstore.

Copyright © 2013 VintagePostcards.org

 

Baseball Postcard from Gresham, Oregon

Gresham, Oregon Baseball Postcard of Catcher Jack Hamlin

Meet young Jack Hamlin, whose picture was taken c. 1915. He wears a catcher’s mitt and has what appears to be a hard ball in hand in this scarce unused Azo Tri 1 real-photo postcard (otherwise known as an RPPC). Hamlin played for a Gresham, Oregon baseball team. This vintage postcard is nicely detailed and sharply focused, with great clarity. We were never able to ascertain the full name of the S & L team whose name is on the front of Hamlin’s baseball shirt. If you know, let us know, and we’ll publish the answer to this Multnomah County history question.


See a 1908 postcard from Grand Rapids, Michigan, of a notable downtown anchor building currently undergoing a rehab. Browse our sports collectibles. Thousands of vintage postcards can be accessed via the search box on the home page of VintagePostcards.org. Or, unwind in the world’s largest postcard bookstore.

Copyright © 2013 VintagePostcards.org


    

A Grand Rapids, Michigan Vintage Postcard

Morton House Hotel and West's Pharmacy in Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1908

This antique Grand Rapids, Michigan postcard has found a new home. Very nicely detailed and with deep, rich colors, this vintage postcard shows the Morton House at 55 Ionia Ave., NW in Grand Rapids, MI, draped in patriotic bunting and with West’s Drug Store and a barber pole at ground level. Two early bicycles are propped up in front of the pharmacy, along the dirt road. While it has unfortunate paper loss at the bottom right corner, the paper loss doesn’t materially detract from this otherwise desirable Kent County collectible. Postmarked in 1908 and sent to the Honorable C. J. Wilson of N. Main St. in Urbana, Ohio, it was published by A. C. Bosselman & Co. of New York.

The hotel, at the intersection of Monroe Center and Ionia Ave., served as a low-income housing complex for 40 years, and was vacated in August 2011. Since then, it’s been purchased and, as of December 2012, Rockford Construction was in design stages to re-purpose the building as a mixed-use building with retail on the ground floor, office space above that, and market-rate housing on upper levels.


Read about what an old Florida motel postcard meant to one reader, or browse our other Michigan postcards. Thousands of vintage postcards can be accessed via the search box on the home page of VintagePostcards.org. Or, unwind in the world’s largest postcard bookstore.

Copyright © 2013 VintagePostcards.org


    

Sandra Ann Motel in Jacksonville, Florida

Sandra Ann Roadside Motel in Jacksonville, FL

One of the most satisfying moments for me as a postcard dealer is hearing the stories of why people buy the old postcards that they buy. A St. Augustine resident named …Sandra Ann bought this vintage postcard last week. We had occasion to chat on the phone for a few minutes and, since her mother died, Sandra Ann has found herself thinking more about the past. Her mother had told her that, as newlyweds, Sandra Ann’s parents had driven past this motel. Her mother thought that Sandra Ann was a pretty name, and so Sandra Ann was excited to find this triple-view postcard of the motel which provided the inspiration for her name. It was located at 8375 New Kings Rd. on U.S. Highway 1, at the time about three miles north of Jacksonville, FL.

Postmarked in 1954, the pink motel had 40 rooms, television, and a restaurant was nearby. The postcard was sent to Esther Davis of 16 Jackson Ave. in Endicott, NY by someone named Marguerite, who spoke of her stay at the motel.


Another interesting story of a found treasure came from an elderly woman who bought a 1952 motel postcard with a black background. It wasn’t in the best of shape but, nevertheless, I thought perhaps someone would like to have it. The buyer was ecstatic — now elderly, she and her husband had honeymooned at that Wisconsin motel in 1952.

We’d love to hear your stories of how vintage postcards reconnected you with old family memories. There is a comment box below for your use.

Read about Buffalo Bill Cody, or see more roadside America post cards at our website. Unwind in the world’s largest postcard bookstore.

Copyright © 2013 VintagePostcards.org


    

Buffalo Bill Cody and the Wild West

Buffalo Bill Cody's Widow, Louisa, with Oglala Sioux Indian Chief Red Wolf in Cody, Wyoming, c. 1918

A bit of the Wild West lives on in this scarce c. 1918 real-photo postcard of Louisa Cody, widow of Buffalo Bill Cody. Buffalo Bill, one of the most colorful entertainers of the Old West, was famous for his shows which featured cowboy themes. He died in 1917 of kidney failure; Mrs. Cody herself is elderly in this image. She died about three years after this photograph was taken. A pillow rests at her feet, and her chair is cushioned by a checkered blanket as she suns herself. The real scene stealer is Chief Red Wolf, an Oglala Sioux and American Indian scout who worked with Buffalo Bill. His gaze is piercing. From his elaborately beaded leggings to his feathered war bonnet, his appearance is imposing.


On the the reverse, the antique post card reads: “Compliments of Mrs. W. F. Cody. My Foster Mother and Chief Red Wolf, an old Indian Scout of Buffalo Bill’s. Borned [sic] on Pineridge, S. Decota [the Pine Ridge, South Dakota Indian reservation].” Along the bottom is written the date January 8, 1856. Was this Chief Red Wolf’s birth date, or that of Mrs. Cody? The location is given as Cody, Wyoming.

Compliments of Mrs. W. F. Cody, My Foster Mother

One of my favorite poems is about Buffalo Bill, and was written by e. e. cummings:

Buffalo Bill’s

defunct

who used to

ride a watersmooth-silver

stallion

and break onetwothreefourfive pigeonsjustlikethat

Jesus

he was a handsome man

and what i want to know is

how do you like your blueeyed boy

Mister Death

Read about a charming Victorian store, or see more native American post cards at our website. Unwind in the world’s largest postcard bookstore.

Copyright © 2009 VintagePostcards.org


    

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