Use SFTdyn to host your own dynamic dns server. The github page describes the whole setup process so there's no point in going over it again. This article will show you how you can create a free letsencrypt certificate for these dynamic domains without ...

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PatchLog"PatchLog" - 5 new articles

  1. DIY dynamic dns and ssl certificates
  2. Installing cordova fails
  3. Tevo Little Monster delta grid compensation
  4. Recompile Dovecot with Vpopmail on Debian
  5. grub2 notes
  6. More Recent Articles

DIY dynamic dns and ssl certificates

Use SFTdyn to host your own dynamic dns server. The github page describes the whole setup process so there's no point in going over it again.

 

This article will show you how you can create a free letsencrypt certificate for these dynamic domains without running a http server on them. ( in case you want to use them for something like a smtp service or a http server that's not supported by the certbot plugins ).

When setting up SFTdyn you configured bind to accept local updates. We'll use the same key for the certbot dns plugin so it can do dns challenges for creating and renewing certificates.

The certbot dns plugin needs a configuration file ( ~/.secrets/certbot/rfc2136.ini ) that looks like this:

# Target DNS server ( always use an ip address here )
dns_rfc2136_server = 12.34.56.78
# Target DNS port
dns_rfc2136_port = 53
# TSIG key name ( this has to be set to local-ddns ) 
dns_rfc2136_name = local-ddns
# TSIG key secret ( get this from the ddns server's /var/run/bind/session.key  ) 
dns_rfc2136_secret = splfUqpteoHQ43DDzGKvMS6L3oCjzv20WpKfhxhgWo0=
# TSIG key algorithm
dns_rfc2136_algorithm = HMAC-SHA256

The secret will probably change when you restart bind, so make sure to update the rfc2136.ini file after you do it. Or you can add the contents of the /var/run/bind/session.key file to the named.conf.local file and then change the key's name to something like "remote-key" and then also change the ~/.secrets/certbot/rfc2136.ini file to reflect the name of the new key so you don't have to bother to copy the key every time you restart bind.

When all this is set up just run :

certbot certonly --dns-rfc2136 --dns-rfc2136-credentials ~/.secrets/certbot/rfc2136.ini -d <my-domain-name>

    

Installing cordova fails

I've just set up a new computer (macOS) and when I tried to install cordova it failed. It looked like it was doing somthing for a suspiciouly short time and then it exit whitout any error.

 

It seems the problem was I was trying to install it from an app folder that contained a folder named cordova and although I was running "sudo npm install -g cordova" which is supposed to install it globally it didn't work. All it did was to link my app folder to /usr/local/lib/node_modules . After I removed the link and ran "npm install -g cordova" it installed correctly.

Note to self: next time you install cordova on a new computer make sure you don't do it from a place where there's already a "cordova" folder.

    

Tevo Little Monster delta grid compensation

Before you start the calibration check if you have the grid calibration enabled in the smoothieware config file:
My config has this:

#Example for the delta grid leveling strategy
leveling-strategy.delta-grid.enable true # Enable grid leveling
leveling-strategy.delta-grid.radius 140 # Grid radius in millimeters
leveling-strategy.delta-grid.size 29 # Grid size, must be an odd number

 

The bigger the grid size, the more points it will test and the longer will take.

Heat the printbed to the temperature you normally print with.

Do the grid calibration:

; home
G28

;bltouch alarm release
M280 PS10.6

; probe pin down
M280 S3

; set bed temp to 80C
M190 S80

; do delta calibration
G32

; save trim to sdcard
M500

; probe the grid and enable grid compensation
G31

; save the grid to sd card
M374

;To set the zero for the print head
;Make sure there is no left over material on the nozzle ( maybe heat and wipe it )
;go home
G28

;go close to Z=0
G0 Z1

; put a sheet of thin paper under the nozzle
; Then move the head ( using the printer controls ) until it presses on the paper sheet, until ; you feel the friction when you pull on the paper. This is the Z=0 point
; Use this point as the homing offest
M306 Z0

;save to SD card
M500

But even after all this it seems the prints are still not all right, so another option is to do some manual calibration of the hotbed using some springs. 

    

Recompile Dovecot with Vpopmail on Debian

Here's a script I use to quickly recompile dovecot with vpopmail support on Debian 6.0. I'm using the backports repository to get the 2.1 version of dovecot.

Now I'm using the following script every time I update and I get a new version of the dovecot packages.

  1. #!/bin/bash
  2.  
  3. BDIR=./dovecot.$(date +%Y-%m-%d_%H-%M-%S)
  4.  
  5. mkdir $BDIR
  6. cd $BDIR
  7.  
  8. sudo apt-get source dovecot-core
  9. sudo apt-get build-dep dovecot-core
  10. dpkg-source -x *.dsc
  11.  
  12. cd $(find ./ -type d |grep dovecot|head -1)
  13.  
  14. sed -r -e 's/with-sqlite \\/with-sqlite \\\n\t\t--with-vpopmail \\/' debian/rules > debian/rules.mod
  15. cat debian/rules.mod > debian/rules
  16.  
  17. DEB_BUILD_OPTIONS="--with-vpopmail" fakeroot debian/rules binary
  18.  
  19. find $BDIR -type f -name "*.deb"|grep -v 'dbg' |xargs dpkg -i
  20.  
  21.  

The last line also installs all the dovecot packages except for the debug one. You might want to change it if you don't want all.

    

grub2 notes

Grub2 configuration is in /etc/defaut/grub ( on Debian at least ).

Set GRUB_DEFAULT=saved in /etc/default/grub if you want to start with the last good boot.

update-grub - detects kernels automatically and writes boot lines to /boot/grub/grub.conf

grub-set-default - set the default entry ( First boot entry is number 0 )

grub-reboot - set the boot entry for the next reboot only ( for testing new kernels or other boot stuff especially when you're working remotely )

    

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