Oh, that huge A&P textbook I teach from! Do I really need to cover all of it? Host Kevin Patton discusses his take on this age-old problem. Does the color of my marking pen send a signal that I don't want to send to my students? A breakthrough in ...
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Do A&P Textbooks Have Too Much Content? | TAPP 94

 

Oh, that huge A&P textbook I teach from! Do I really need to cover all of it? Host Kevin Patton discusses his take on this age-old problem. Does the color of my marking pen send a signal that I don't want to send to my students? A breakthrough in understanding how teeth sense cold. And what in the world is a tunneling nanotube—and can I get one at my local hardware store? Greek names for SARS-CoV-2 variants simplifies conversation and avoids stigma.

00:00 | Introduction

00:43 | How Do Teeth Sense Cold?

07:04 | Sponsored by AAA

08:32 | Red & Green for Student Feedback

18:03 | What's a TNT?

23:52 | Sponsored by HAPI

25:06 | Greek Names for COVID Variants

30:24 | Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? Are Mittens Too Big?

36:41 | Sponsored by HAPS

39:15 | Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? What About Novels?

46:35 | Staying Connected

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html/#badge

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)

Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor

Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates theAPprofessor.org/updates

Do A&P textbooks have too much content? Don't tell me that thought has never occurred to you! (Kevin Patton)

 

How Do Teeth Sense Cold?

6.5 minutes

We know that teeth damaged by caries (cavities), decay, injury, wear, etc., can be very sensitive to cold—such as ice cream or cold drinks. But we've struggled to come up with a mechanism for that. A new discovery proposes that the ion channel TRCP5 may be the responsible cold sensor. And that may lead to some easy fixes for cold-sensitive teeth. 

★ Odontoblast TRPC5 channels signal cold pain in teeth (discovery from Science Advances mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3w888Cg

★ Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 5 (TRPC5) is a cold-transducer in the peripheral nervous system (some earlier research on the cold-sensing function of TRPC5) my-ap.us/3pnhdEM

★ Image from PxHere

person with ice cream cone

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Red & Green for For Student Feedback

9.5 minutes

Kevin revisits his recommendation to use a green pennot a red pen—for marking grades and giving student feedback. That holds over to digital communications, such as course announcements and instructions, too. Listen to the reasons—you may be surprised!

★ No Red Pens! (Kevin’s blog post on this topic; with links to additional information/research) my-ap.us/2SbyDbr

Give Your Course a Half Flip With a Full Twist | Episode 6 (Kevin's earlier discussion of green pens for marking)

★ Coblis—Color Blindness Simulator (you can paste in your text with color fonts, or an image, and see what it might look like in major color vision variants) my-ap.us/2T33Xt6

★ Green Pens geni.us/p2BW

★ Photo by animatedheaven from PxHere

the word

 

What's a TNT?

5.5 minutes

The tunneling nanotube (TNT) is not an organelle we typically discuss in the undergrad A&P course—just like a lot of other recently-discovered organelles. But sometimes it's worth mentioning the ongoing work of discovery in this area—and the excitement of such exploration—as a way to connect students with our course content.

★ Tunneling nanotubes: Reshaping connectivity (review-opinion article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3fUpM6X

★ Wiring through tunneling nanotubes--from electrical signals to organelle transfer (an earlier work from Journal of Cell Science) my-ap.us/3poC5LW

★ Got Proteasomes? (Kevin's brief post about why he teaches proteasomes in A&P) my-ap.us/3pp0NvA

★ Image from Radiation Oncology

two red cells connected by a long tunneling nanotube (TNT)

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Greek Names for COVID Variants

5.5 minutes

Considering the adverse social effects of calling the 1918 influenza "Spanish flu" and the SARS-CoV-2 "the China virus," the World Health Organization has proposed calling variants of SARS-CoV-2 by letters of the Greek alphabet (alpha, beta, gamma, ...) in ordinary conversation. These are to supplement the more technical systems of naming the variants in the scientific literature.

★ Coronavirus variants get Greek names — but will scientists use them? | From Alpha to Omega, the labelling system aims to avoid confusion and stigmatization. (News item in Nature) my-ap.us/3uPC70F

★ Tracking SARS-CoV-2 variants (WHO information that includes a longer list of SARS-CoV-2 variants) my-ap.us/3vZJ0xQ

Mid-Winter Winterizing of Our Courses | Bonus Episode 63 (where Spanish flu is discussed)

Even More Pandemic Teaching Tips | TAPP 72 (where I apologize for using the term Spanish flu)

★ Image from Wikimedia

upper and lower case Greek letter

 

Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? Are Mittens Too Big?

6.5 minutes

I first heard complaints about A&P textbooks being too large in the mid-1970s—when they were much smaller on average than today's A&P textbooks. But are they really too large? Let's explore that notion.

★ Your Textbook is a Mitten, Not a Glove (Kevin's brief article mentioned in this segment) https://my-ap.us/2E0sZP1
READ and RAID your textbook (Kevin's brief article for students on a useful approach to using their A&P textbook) my-ap.us/2P3KuBZ

★ Selling your textbook? (Kevin's brief article for students on why they need to keep their A&P textbook—to access that "extra content" in their later courses & career) my-ap.us/3g8Q9Fm

★ Plaid Mittens geni.us/yicVmBi

★ Photo from PxHere

person covering their face with mitten-covered hands

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Are A&P Textbooks Too Long? What About Novels?

7.5 minutes

Okay, novels can be too long. But only when they're not good. Long, good novels are, um, usually pretty darn good. But we don't dive into every detail of a novel when learning about it in a literature course, do we? What's this got to do with A&P? Listen and find out!

★ The Stranger (novella by Albert Camus) geni.us/Rwbw

★ Photo from PxHere

reading a book

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html

★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-94.html

★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level!

theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast:

theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates

★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J

★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander

★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ

★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW

★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp

★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors

★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org

★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps

★ Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor

The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Weight Stigma! The Difficult Cadaver | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 93

 

Weight stigma among health professionals is a form of discrimination that can have serious consequences in the lives of people who are overweight or obese. These folks are therefore often pre-judged as being difficult patients, for example. Krista Rompolski joins us for a Journal Club episode, where we discuss a paper on how attitudes about large body donors may contribute to weight stigma among health professionals. What's going on? Is there anything we educators do to influence student attitudes? An important topic for our times, for sure!

00:00 | Introduction

01:10 | Journal Club with Krista Rompolski

03:05 | Sponsored by AAA

04:01 | The "difficult" cadaver: weight bias in the gross anatomy lab

11:43 | Sponsored by HAPI

12:31 | The Conversation Begins

29:31 | Sponsored by HAPS

30:26 | The Conversation Continues

59:46 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player, go to: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-93.html

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode: theAPprofesssor.org/podcast-episode-XX.html/#badge

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram! @theAPprofessor
Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates

Research indicates that weight stigma can cause physical and psychological harm, and that affected individuals are less likely to receive adequate care. For these reasons, weight stigma damages health, undermines human and social rights, and is unacceptable in modern societies. (Joint international consensus statement for ending stigma of obesity)

 

Journal Club with Krista Rompolski

2 minutes

Krista Rompolski joins host Kevin Patton for another TAPP Journal Club episode!

 

Episode 93: Weight Stigma! The Difficult Cadaver

 

Sponsored by AAA

1 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

The "Difficult" Cadaver

7.5 minutes

Krista Rompolski summarizes the essential content of this episode's journal article.

★ The “difficult” cadaver: weight bias in the gross anatomy lab (article from the journal Medical Education) my-ap.us/3yfanp1

Weight Stigma! The Difficult Cadaver | Journal Club Episode | TAPP 93

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

The Conversation Begins

17 minutes

Krista and Kevin discuss what they learned from the article and how that relates to their own experience as teachers and learners. Here are some background resources, if you want to know more about the topics discussed:

★ The Bizarre and Racist History of the BMI | Body Mass Index has been used in recent decades as a referendum on individual health. But it was never meant to be. (essay) my-ap.us/3fnmuaX

★ What We Talk About When We Talk About Fat Acceptance (public radio interview/conversation) my-ap.us/3btntoO

bathroom scale

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

The Conversation Continues

29 minutes

There is so much to say about weight bias and its origins among health professionals. Even more than we can fit into this lengthy discussion!

★ Implicit and Explicit Weight Bias in a National Sample of 4,732 Medical Students: The Medical Student CHANGES Study (the Phelan paper mentioned by Krista) my-ap.us/3wdG4wX

The Silent Teacher – A Conversation with Aaron Fried | Episode 29 (where Kevin discusses his wanting to be desirable body donor)

photo of fat people and

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.
★ More details at the episode page: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-93.html
★ Transcript available in the transcript box: theAPprofessor.org/podcast-episode-93.html
★ Need help accessing resources locked behind a paywall? Check out this advice from Episode 32 to get what you need! https://youtu.be/JU_l76JGwVw?t=440
 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 
theAPprofessor.org/community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 
theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources
★ TAPP Science & Education Updates: theAPprofessor.org/updates
★ Amazon: amzn.to/2r6Qa3J
★ Text Expander: theapprofessor.org/textexpander
★ Rev.com: try.rev.com/Cw2nZ
★ Snagit & Camtasia: techsmith.pxf.io/9MkPW
★ Krisp Free Noise-Cancelling App: theAPprofessor.org/krisp
★ The A&P Professor Logo Items: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-a-p-professor
 
Sponsors
★ Transcript and captions for this episode are supported by the American Association for Anatomy | anatomy.org
★ The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society provides marketing support for this podcast | theAPprofessor.org/haps
★ Distribution of this episode is supported by NYCC's online graduate program in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction (HAPI) | nycc.edu/hapi

Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram @theAPprofessor
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Are We Answering Student Questions? | Science Updates | TAPP 92

 

Episode 92 is all about how we can use customer-service concepts in education. Tune in and hear Kevin Patton discuss the importance of being a good listener and empathetic responder. You’ll also hear about new research that shows not all plaques are bad actors when it comes to Alzheimer disease. And finally, find out how to get free almost-daily updates on life science, teaching, and learning!

  • 00:00 | Introduction
  • 00:53 | New Discovery about Plaque
  • 08:33 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 09:51 | New TAPP Science & Education Updates
  • 15:23 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 16:45 | Are We Answering Student Questions?
  • 30:52| Sponsored by HAPS
  • 31:40 | Power Skills for Answering Students
  • 40:19 | Staying Connected

 

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram!

Get the almost-daily TAPP Science & Education Updates

 

The most basic of all human needs is the need to understand and be understood. The best way to understand people is to listen to them. (Ralph Nichols)

 

New Discovery about Plaque

7.5 minutes

In teaching A&P, it's not our objective to dive too deeply into pathophysiology. But we do use it as a tool to help students understand and apply concepts of "normal" structure and function. A new discovery about plaque's role in Alzheimer disease—or perhaps what is NOT its role—is a story that at once helps students make clinical applications, lets students know more about the vital functions of glial cells, and gives a glimpse of contemporary scientific discovery.

  • Plaque Protect: Study Makes Surprising Finding About Alzheimer's Hallmark (summary article) my-ap.us/3aJFzCy
  • In surprising twist, some Alzheimer’s plaques may be protective, not destructive (announcement from Salk Institute) my-ap.us/2S9BvW5
  • Microglia use TAM receptors to detect and engulf amyloid β plaques (research article from Nature Immunology) my-ap.us/3eBEf5S
  • Image: dense-core amyloid-beta plaque (red) surrounded by microglia (white) [Credit: Salk Institute] my-ap.us/3gFlp0l

dense-core amyloid-beta plaque (red) surrounded by microglia (white)

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

New TAPP Science & Education Update

5.5 minutes

You may (or may not) remember that Nuzzel newsletter I've had going a couple of years. It was an almost-daily curated list of headlines of interest to anatomy and physiology faculty (and, I've discovered, some random non-A&P folks who just like the content). Well, Nuzzel is suddenly shutting down it's newsletter function and so I've switched to Revue by Twitter. Here's how to subscribe (it's free) if you're not already subscribed:

screenshot of sample issue of TAPP Updates newsletter

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Are We Answering Student Questions?

14 minutes

No, really. Am I really answering what each student wants to know? Or am I simply reacting to key words or phrases without really listening to the specifics of each student question. This segment asks us to consider using some customer-service (gasp!) techniques to make sure we're not leaving our students alone and frustrated.

face hidden by a question mark

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Power Skill for Answering Students

8.5 minutes

Starting with some "power phrases" from a recent article, we explore some words and phrases to use when answering student questions.

  • These 7 phrases can help you sound more powerful at work (article mentioned in this segment) my-ap.us/3eykP1N

students

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 
The A&P Professor community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 
theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

 
Sponsors


Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Burnout! A Chat with Rebecca Pope-Ruark | TAPP 91

 

Burnout is a serious issue that can affect your health, relationships, and job performance. It’s important to know the signs of burnout so you can take steps to prevent it from happening in the first place. But if you do experience burnout, don’t panic! There are ways for you to get back on track and feel good again. Listen to this episode of The A&P Professor with Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark about how we can avoid, deal with, or be there for others experiencing burnout! You'll be glad you did!

  • 00:00 | Introduction
  • 00:48 | Rebecca Pope-Ruark
  • 02:42 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 04:08 | Burnout & How to Fix It
  • 18:41 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 19:59 | Reducing Academic Burnout
  • 34:42 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 35:59 | Student Burnout
  • 41:54 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

Questions & Feedback: 1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336)
Follow The A&P Professor on Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram!

Connection with peers, rather than competition, can drive our creative energy and help us through difficult times. (Rebecca Pope-Ruark)

 

Rebecca Pope-Ruark

2 minutes

Introduction to this episode's special guest, Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark. She's an author of the popular book Agile Faculty, host of the Agile Faculty podcast, and an expert in faculty burnout.

  • The Agile Faculty Life (Rebecca Pope-Ruark's website) my-ap.us/3dAYcJB
  • Agile Academic (Rebecca Pope-Ruark's blog) my-ap.us/31MFLfB
  • The Agile Academic Podcast (Rebecca Pope-Ruark's podcast for women in higher ed) my-ap.us/3dysixv
  • Agile Faculty: Practical Strategies for Managing Research, Service, and Teaching (book by Rebecca Pope-Ruark) amzn.to/3wrZFKU

Photo of Rebecca Pope-Ruark and caption

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Burnout & How to Fix It

14.5 minutes

Following up on a recent online HAPS webinar hosted by Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark lays out some of the basics of burnout. What is burnout? Is it different than stress? How can we deal with faculty burnout?

  • Keeping the Spark - March 10, 2021. Presentation by Rebecca Pope-Ruark on faculty burnout and how to avoid or recover from it. Sponsored by HAPS and AACA. (recording of presentation) my-ap.us/3rSOsQb

flames with title

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1.5 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Reducing Academic Burnout

14.5 minutes

What can we do to prevent or reduce faculty burnout? Are there ways we can support each other and keep each other out of "the burn?"
burning matches

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1.5 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

HAPS logo

 

Student Burnout

6 minutes

Yes, there are things we can do in our courses to help with student burnout.fatigued woman with laptop

 

If the hyperlinks here are not active, go to TAPPradio.org to find the episode page.

 
Take The A&P Professor experience to the next level! 
The A&P Professor community
 
Earn cash by referring other A&P faculty to this podcast: 
theAPprofessor.org/refer
 
Tools & Resources

 
Sponsors


Clicking on sponsor links helps let them know you appreciate their support of this podcast!

Follow The A&P Professor on  Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, Revue, Tumblr, or Instagram!
The A&P Professor® and Lion Den® are registered trademarks of Lion Den Inc. (Kevin Patton)

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. I may be compensated for links to sponsors and certain other links.


Click here to listen to this episode—or access the detailed notes and transcript.

Taking Bold Steps in Teaching | Notetaking | Science Updates | TAPP 90

 

Episode 90 of The A&P Professor podcast is a thematic smörgåsbord, full of tasty tidbits to share with students and colleagues. Host Kevin Patton talks about dealing with resistance when we try to take bold steps in teaching. Is note taking better with a paper or an electronic device? The effects of diluting blood plasma on aging (don't try this at home).And the phenomenon of pandemic weight change.

  • 00:00 | Introduction
  • 01:06 | Notetaking: Paper or Digital?
  • 13:14 | Sponsored by AAA
  • 14:53 | Pandemic Twenty?
  • 19:27 | Sponsored by HAPI
  • 20:39 | Diluted Blood: Fountain of Youth?
  • 28:25 | Sponsored by HAPS
  • 29:37 | Taking Bold Steps in Teaching
  • 42:57 | Long-Term Learning Seminar
  • 44:20 | More Bold Steps
  • 50:46 | Staying Connected

If you cannot see or activate the audio player click here.

Apply for your credential (badge/certificate) for listening to this episode.

Please take the anonymous survey: theAPprofessor.org/survey

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Of all frictional resistances, the one that most retards human movement is ignorance, what Buddha called ‘the greatest evil in the world’. The friction which results from ignorance can be reduced only by the spread of knowledge and the unification of the heterogeneous elements of humanity. No effort could be better spent. (Nikola Tesla)

 

Notetaking: Paper or Digital?

12 minutes

It's the battle of paper notetaking vs. digital notetaking. Who's the winner? Are are we ready to declare a winner?

  • The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking (journal article from Psychological Science) my-ap.us/39qbNCo
  • Don’t Ditch the Laptop Just Yet: Replication Finds No Immediate Advantage to Writing Notes by Hand (blog article from American Psychological Association) my-ap.us/39svN7h
  • Don’t Ditch the Laptop Just Yet: A Direct Replication of Mueller and Oppenheimer’s (2014) Study 1 Plus Mini Meta-Analyses Across Similar Studies (journal article from Psychological Science) my-ap.us/3fpmHff
  • Paper Notebooks vs. Mobile Devices: Brain Activation Differences During Memory Retrieval (journal article from Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience) my-ap.us/3u3YjEb
  • Stronger Brain Activity After Writing on Paper Than on Tablet or Smartphone (article at Neuroscience News) my-ap.us/3ftufxE

student writing in a notebook

 

Sponsored by AAA

1.5 minute

A searchable transcript for this episode, as well as the captioned audiogram of this episode, are sponsored by the American Association for Anatomy (AAA) at anatomy.org.

Searchable transcript

Captioned audiogram 

Don't forget—HAPS members get a deep discount on AAA membership!

AAA logo

 

Pandemic Twenty?

4.5 minutes

Originally conceived as the equivalent of the mythical "freshmen 15," the "pandemic 15" may turn out to be the "pandemic twenty" or more. Or less. Listen and find out.

  • How Much Weight Did We Gain During Lockdowns? 2 Pounds a Month, Study Hints (article from New York Times) my-ap.us/3fqgX5a
  • Body Weight Changes During Pandemic-Related Shelter-in-Place in a Longitudinal Cohort Study (journal article from Journal of the American Medical Association) my-ap.us/3dg5L8y

woman with medical mask looking out window

 

Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program

1 minute

The Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction—the MS-HAPI—is a graduate program for A&P teachers, especially for those who already have a graduate/professional degree. A combination of science courses (enough to qualify you to teach at the college level) and courses in contemporary instructional practice, this program helps you be your best in both on-campus and remote teaching. Kevin Patton is a faculty member in this program. Check it out!

nycc.edu/hapi

NYCC Human Anatomy and Physiology Instruction

 

Diluted Blood: Fountain of Youth?

7.5 minutes

New research suggests that diluting our blood plasma could reduce or reverse some effects of aging. Don't try this at home!

  • Rejuvenation of three germ layers tissues by exchanging old blood plasma with saline-albumin (journal article) my-ap.us/31lDHeq
  • Diluting blood plasma rejuvenates tissue and reverses aging (summary article of the recent research) my-ap.us/3cjkGiR
  • Rejuvenation of aged progenitor cells by exposure to a young systemic environment. (Journal article on the 2005 research) my-ap.us/3ckyUQu

camera phone showing a baby, but pointing to an elderly person

 

Sponsored by HAPS

1 minute

The Human Anatomy & Physiology Society (HAPS) is a sponsor of this podcast.  You can help appreciate their support by clicking the link below and checking out the many resources and benefits found there. Watch for virtual town hall meetings and upcoming regional meetings!

Anatomy & Physiology Society

theAPprofessor.org/haps

Check out: My Experience in Striving for Equitable Education in A&P Curriculum: Why it Matters to my Students (HAPS blog post) my-ap.us/39q8R8B

HAPS logo

 

Taking Bold Steps in Teaching

13 minutes

Ever feel resistance from peers when suggesting a try of  new or different teaching or curriculum strategies? Yeah, me too.

woman leaning forward

 

Long-Term Learning Seminar

1.5 minute

Here's a great refresher of some basic evidence-based strategies that you can use to take a bold step in teaching: Five Powerful Ways You Can Enhance Long-Term Learning in Your A&P Course

  • Topics include:
    • spaced retrieval practice
    • test debriefing
    • pre-testing
    • cumulative testing
    • initial exams
  • Don't forget! You can earn a digital credential in professional development for this online seminar.

Long-Term Learning

 

More Bold Steps

6.5 minutes

The conversation continues with some practical advice. For example, how to bring your critics on board with your bold ideas!

 

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