Generally speaking, the Washington Post editorial board does a great job on trade issues. They are pro-trade and they see trade agreements as a way to liberalize trade. However, I want to offer a response to something in a recent Post editorial about ...

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The Debate over NAFTA Chapter 19 | Cato @ Liberty
Generally speaking, the Washington Post editorial board does a great job on trade issues. They are pro-trade and they see trade agreements as a way to liberalize trade. However, I want to offer a response to something in a recent Post editorial about one particular technical aspect of the NAFTA renegotiation. Here’s the passage:
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U.S. uncorks wine complaints ahead of NAFTA talks - Macleans.ca
Canada’s protectionist rules around wine has irked the U.S. ahead of NAFTA renegotiation talks
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A Nafta Win for Trump May Rest on Helping Mexican Workers Get a Raise - Bloomberg
President Donald Trump has gone after Mexicans for stealing U.S. jobs. Now he’s trying to get workers south of the border a pay raise.
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NAFTA's 'Broken Promises': These Farmers Say They Got The Raw End Of Trade Deal : The Salt : NPR

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Trump's high-risk, high-reward trade policy toward China • AEI | Economics Blog » AEIdeas
The White House is reportedly planning to investigate China’s unfair trade practices, such as stealing American intellectual property and requiring US companies to share their advanced technologies in exchange for access to the Chinese market. The move quickly drove a split in the US business community, leaving some cheerful for the long overdue measures to level the playing field and others concerned about possible retaliation from Beijing.
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