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Grammar Source"Grammar Source" - 5 new articles

  1. Recommended for Reference
  2. The Case of ‘As Long As’ v. ‘So Long As’
  3. Dana Loesch, the NRA and Fake News: Your Opinion Please
  4. You Can Have Your Covfefe and Eat It Too
  5. The Most Complicated Word in the English Language Is Just Three Letters Long
  6. More Recent Articles

Recommended for Reference

If you have any Ad Blocker turned on, you won’t see my recommendations.

 

The Case of ‘As Long As’ v. ‘So Long As’

Okay, so my “fake news” post bombed. Let’s move on to real grammatical issues.

Almost everyone I hear or read uses the phrase “as long as” in the conditional sense, as in, “as long as you don’t care, neither do I.” Wrong!

The phase “as long as” is a comparison of lengths. “That building is as long as three football fields” is one example of correct usage.

“So long as” is a conditional phrase, as in “so long as you don’t care, neither do I.”

    

Dana Loesch, the NRA and Fake News: Your Opinion Please

This is simply a post to generate comments. Remember, I monitor everything, so no hate, stupidity, useless rants, four-letter words, ad nauseum, will be approved. Be rational, at ease and make sense, whatever your belief is. Thank you.

Do you believe the Left and their puppets in the Media are carrying out 1984-cum-Animal Farm?

Watch the video with NRA spokesperson Dana Loesch.

 

    

You Can Have Your Covfefe and Eat It Too

Or can you?

A mysterious tweet by Donald Trump — “Despite the negative press covfefe” — went viral for about five-and-a-half hours earlier today, leading to all kinds of humor and speculation on the social media.

I sometimes end up making mysterious words and sentences when I put my cell phone in my pocket while it’s still on. Bodily movements and hand-in-pocket gyrations make for weird words and sentences, but this tweet seemed to start out straight and end with a new word.

Covfefe.

Coming soon to a market near you, a new candy bar called Covfefe.

    

The Most Complicated Word in the English Language Is Just Three Letters Long

Wanna guess what that three-letter word is before reading about it? Take a few seconds and then go to:

The Most Complicated Word in English???

    

More Recent Articles


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