Rodger Martin recommends Field Guide: A Tempo by Henry Walters (Hobblebush Books, 2014) This 2014 Granite State Poetry Series collection by Henry Walters is an intricate philosophical song to music and nature. One can delve deeply into the philosophy in ...

NH Poetry: Field Guide and more...


NH Poetry: Field Guide

Rodger Martin recommends Field Guide: A Tempo by Henry Walters (Hobblebush Books, 2014)  

This 2014 Granite State Poetry Series collection by Henry Walters is an intricate philosophical song to music and nature.  One can delve deeply into the philosophy in a reading, but when these poems are spoken aloud, a hidden layer is exposed whose richness and depth carries one away as if on the wings of one of those hawks Walters has nurtured back to the wild.    

Rodger Martin, editor and poet, Monadnock Pastoral Pets, Hancock, NH.  His latest book, For All The Tea in Zhōngguó,  (Hobblebush) features a dual language (Mandarin/English) collection of his poetry published in China and poets from China he has translated as part of the Poetry Bridging Continents Series.  

This post is part of our celebration of National Poetry Month 2021 for which I asked New Hampshire poets to recommend books of poetry by Granite State poets. These titles are generally available from local booksellers and may be held in public libraries as well.
    
 

NH Poetry: Human Half

L.R. Berger recommends The Human Half by Deborah Brown (Boa Editions, Ltd, 2019)

Between the covers of this remarkably beautiful collection Deborah Brown reveals a rich and seemingly improbable universe. While anchored in the map of New England cedar shakes, drooping barns, beetle dung, and the rattle of dried peas in a coffee can, these poems take wide-flung excursions. Browns exacting observations and intelligence are so trustworthy we unquestionably want go with her. 

Inside the world of The Human Half, Pinocchio lizards coexist with the street dogs of San Juan, Aleppos dead, Platos cave, and, in Hunan Province, the sighting of a white passion flower thought extinct.  Van Gogh, Vermeer, Vernet, and Matisse all make appearances, along with a mothers red suit worn to a daughters funeral, and a bearded Jonah look-alike cleaning fish at the Oyster River Seafood Market. 

In these poems the unfamiliar serves to shed light on the nature of the often painfully familiar: a brothers electroshock treatments, a sisters cancer, wars borderlands, a childs whipping, artifacts of a dissolved marriage.  But light is shed heartfully too on the often overlooked beauty where planets protest their innocence.

Here, sightings are sensitively probed for the buried twig of truth, and the whirlwind of otherwise estranged fragments of experience are momentarily an interwoven whole.  How does she do this?

The poet claims I am never quite where I am.  Perhaps it is because she somehow manages to be everywhere.

L.R.Bergers collection of poems, The Unexpected Aviary, received the Jane Kenyon Award for Outstanding Book of Poetry. Shes been recipient of fellowships and support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the PEN New England Discovery Award, the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts, and The American Academy in Rome. With Kamal Boullatta, she assisted in the translation from the Arabic of Beginnings by Adonis (Pyramid Atlantic Press). Her new collection, Indebted to Wind is forthcoming this year from Deerbrook Editions Press.  She lives and writes within earshot of the Contoocook River. 

This post is part of our celebration of National Poetry Month 2021 for which I asked New Hampshire poets to recommend books of poetry by Granite State poets. These titles are generally available from local booksellers and may be held in public libraries as well.

    
 

NH Poetry: Train to Providence

Patricia Frisella recommends Train to Providenceby William Doreski, with photographs by Rodger Kingston (published by bd-studios.com, 11/1/19, available from Barnes & Noble)
I am a fan of Doreski whose poems are highly descriptive, and almost always at least nod to the fact that we live in a natural world, no matter what craziness is going on around us. I am also a fan of collaborations and ekphrastic art. The poems are written in response to the photographs.
Patricia Frisella lives in Farmington, NH. Most recently her poems have appeared in Lunation, Liberation Poetry Anthology, and Out of the Depths. She is currently working on a florilegium/ theatrum botanicum/flora, tentatively titled, The Flower Keepers.

This post is part of our celebration of National Poetry Month 2021 for which I asked New Hampshire poets to recommend books of poetry by Granite State poets. These titles are generally available from local booksellers and may be held in public libraries as well.

    
 

NH Poetry: Ice Storm

Betsy Snider recommends The Ice Storm by Meg Kearney (Green Linden Press, 2020).

Meg Kearney has written of two indelible forces, one forged by hatred (9/11) and one of nature (an ice storm) which bookended a marriage described in her amazing crown of sonnets, The Ice Storm.  Kearney’s ability to incise marriage into its disparate pieces over the span of a storm is uncanny and unrelenting, much like the storm that surrounds wife and husband.  The marriage begins with “light spilling soft as a brush across canvas” and ends “Platinum bleeding green and then scorched by fire.”  All the nuts and bolts of a marriage are described under Kearney’s gimlet eye:  “Now there’s nothing but dye in the rose.”  
Betsy Snider lives on a lake in Acworth, NH.  She has written two books of poetry, View From the Other Side (Blue Light Press, 2020) and Hope is a Muscle (Blue Light Press, 2015) which won the Blue Light Press Award. 

This post is part of our celebration of National Poetry Month 2021 for which I asked New Hampshire poets to recommend books of poetry by Granite State poets. These titles are generally available from local booksellers and may be held in public libraries as well.

    
 

NH Poetry: Fumbling in the Light

Dan Szczesny recommends Fumbling in the Light by Sidney Hall (Hobblebush Books, 2008)

There's a stark urgency to Sid Hall's collection of revelatory poems. From the rocky coast of Maine to New Hampshire's mountains, to his own backyard, Hall's sophisticated yet deceptively simple collection is all sharp elbows and raging imagery. Individual lines come at you like strobe flashes in pitch dark; he blinds you and gives you light at the same time. From the first verse in the collection, "We will whisper words / into your mouth" the reader understands this is a different place, you're in Sid Hall's world now.

Dan Szczesny is a long-time writer and journalist living in Manchester, NH. He's written several books of travel memoir and non-fiction, including his latest, You and Me: Reflections on Becoming Your Dad. His work can be found at www.danszczesny.com.

 This post is part of our celebration of National Poetry Month 2021 for which I asked New Hampshire poets to recommend books of poetry by Granite State poets. These titles are generally available from local booksellers and may be held in public libraries as well.

    
 

"Posted by:" noreply@blogger.com (Mary Russell)


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