Read on to read about three other family caregivers give us a peek into their lives as care providers for someone who lives with dementia:

Caregiver Support Services

 

CoupleePTjpUapDy7v6Jq...These statistics should make it glaringly obvious that family caregivers are indispensable to our nation as well as to the rest of the world. Without this so-called free care, global health systems would be in far worse trouble than they currently are. I am one of that army of caregivers. Over the span of two decades, I have provided primary care for a total of seven elders, four of whom had dementia of different types. Therefore, I know intimately the toll that years of caregiving for someone with dementia can take.

Read the full article on HealthCentral to learn more about family caregivers and how they support elder care, dementia care, and Alzheimer's care:

Carol is the Candid Caregiver

MedicareFAQ – Medicare Resource Center

Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol  

      

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Photo Credit Freestock.org via Unsplash

Dear Carol: My mom lives with emphysema so she's been on oxygen for more than two years. Mom needs several medications to manage this awful disease, which I understand, but some of her other medications concern me. I’ve asked her current doctor to consider lowering doses or taking her off some of them, but he’s made it plain that her life expectancy is quite limited so he doesn’t want to “rock the boat” by making changes. Meanwhile, Mom is becoming foggier in her thinking, and her memory and balance are bad. Maybe this is just age and poor health...

Read the full question and answer on Inforum to learn more about what too many drugs can do to an older person and how to change that:

Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol  

      

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Photo credit Sneaky Elbow

Dear Carol: My husband’s an experienced carpenter, so there’s rarely been a house problem that he couldn’t fix. Now that’s changed because he had a stroke a year ago, which took away most of his ability to use his tools. He gets upset when he notices things around our home that need fixing because he can’t do the work. I can live with imperfections, but seeing the look on his face when our swollen front door sticks or a deck board cracks makes me want to cry. We can afford to hire the work done...

Read the question and answer on Inforum to learn more about how this wife helps her husband cope with damage from a stroke:

Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol