Why Choose Captive Bred Fish? and more...




Why Choose Captive Bred Fish?

A 20,000-gallon tropical reef aquarium

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A 20,000-gallon tropical reef aquarium stands along the wall behind the reception counters at The Mirage in Las Vegas, Nevada.
From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository

Although captive-bred fish are often slightly more expensive than wild fish, this can often pay off in the long run. For instance, buying a captive-bred fish means that the fish that would be brought in from the wild to be kept as pets are left in the wild. Because divers bring in fish regularly, the amount of fish in the wild regularly goes down faster than it would naturally. This can cause many species of fish to go extinct when they would have survived if we had left them in the wild and bought captive-bred fish.

Types of wild caught fish and methods of capture

It is mainly saltwater fish that are in danger, as many commercial fish farms breed captive freshwater fish. The fish

are not the only ones in danger, many corals and invert species are also being caught or possibly even destroyed. One of the more popular practices to catch wild fish is called cyanide fishing, and it uses cyanide to suffocate the fish until they pass out. Cyanide can also have harmful effects on the habitat, such as bleaching the coral or even causing death to corals, depending on the amount of cyanide used and the exposure time of the coral to the cyanide. The long-term

effects of the cyanide on the fish that survive this method are unknown.

Advantages of captive-bred fish

Additionally, captive-bred fish have spent their whole lives in an aquarium and are much more accustomed to living in a glass container and are much easier to feed than their wild counterparts. They are also much less aggressive than fish in the wild. Species that are caught in the wild have to go through quite an ordeal to get to the local pet store, which cause many of them to die from stress. Captive-bred fish have a much higher rate of survival since they only have to travel from the local pet store to your aquarium. Wild-caught fish may also have potentially deadly diseases that come from parasites and pathogens that are not found in an aquarium. Captive-bred fish are much more likely to be healthy and disease free as long as they are kept in the proper conditions and are not placed in an aquarium with a diseased fish that was caught in the wild.

In conclusion

Captive-bred fish means that once-wild fish were caught, bred, and then raised under the care of experts in special facilities over generations, although some species can possibly be bred in your aquarium. To see how you can help the spread of captive-bred fish, please contact your local aquarium.

The post Why Choose Captive Bred Fish? appeared first on Saltwater Fish Keeping.

        
 

Bubble Tip Anemones

Rainbow Bubble Tip AnemoneThe Bubble Tip Anemone (also known as the BTA or Entacmaea quadricolor) originated from Singapore, Tonga and Fiji and is one of the easiest types of anemone to keep.

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Bubble Tip Anemone description

The trunk is typically brown or maroon, but the tips come in a variety of colors, such as brown, green, orange, red, cream, pink, or a delicate rosy hue, and they can grow up to 12 inches in height (30 centimeters).

Lighting and water needs

To keep these anemones alive long term, you need to have high output lighting, such as Very High Output lighting, High Output Lighting, Metal Halide lighting, or even Power Compact Lighting for shallow tanks.

These anemones also prefer a saltwater tank with a higher specific gravity (in the 1.023 – 1.025 range) and thrive in 25° – 28° C temperatures (75° – 82° F). They also prefer live rocks that are off the sand bed floor of the tank to sit on. They may move slowly around the tank to find a comfortable place to sit down but once they settle they are relatively stationary. A minimum of a 30 gallon tank (114 L) is necessary for these sea creatures.

What do Bubble Tip Anemones eat?

As the Bubble Tip Anemone are carnivores, they feed on finely chopped pieces of chopped up seafood (such as shrimp, mussel, krill, or clam) once or twice a week. To feed, simply stick the seafood on the end of a feeding stick or tank tongs and bring it close to the anemone. The anemone should grasp the food and will then consume it.

When you’ve upset your anemone…

There are only a couple reasons for the anemone to become upset. One is if the lighting, food supply, or water temperature becomes inadequate. This will cause the anemone to become sickly and move around in the tank. If there are other anemones or fish in the tank that make the Bubble Tip Anemone feel threatened, it may retaliate by striking at the offender with it’s venomous tentacles. The anemone will then most likely consume the dead sea creature, as it would do in the wild. The stings may cause skin irritations or allergic reactions, so always wear gloves when handling anemones.

Do Bubble Tips need Clownfish?

Clownfish are the most highly favored fish that are kept with an anemone, but you do not need a clownfish to keep an anemone, nor do you need an anemone to keep a clownfish. When a Bubble Tip Anemone is kept in good condition in may live to about 80 years in captivity. Like fish, anemones are a major commitment and although the bubble tip anemone is relatively low maintenance, it still requires effort to survive.

For information regarding further care or answers to problems regarding your anemone, please contact your local aquarium.

Here’s a video of a Rainbow Bubble Tip Anemone that I found on Youtube:

 

The post Bubble Tip Anemones appeared first on Saltwater Fish Keeping.

        
 

Whoops….

Well… that was just plain dumb. Somehow the comments on posts were turned off. I have turned them back on, sorry about that.

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The post Whoops…. appeared first on Saltwater Fish Keeping.

        
 

Attention All Fish Hobbyists

It is painful for me to watch this site sit and stagnate. It’s a blog I started a long time ago as a demonstration of how to set up a WordPress Blog on another site of mine. An old love of mine, back when I had an 80 gallon saltwater tank and a 15 gallon freshwater tank.

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The sad reality is that I haven’t been able to keep fish for a long time and it looks like I won’t be able to do so anytime soon.

So I’m asking for help, help to keep quality information posted here, to keep the site fresh.

If you keep saltwater or freshwater fish, whether you have a pond or aquarium, I would like to put your knowledge, your stories, here.

Use the contact form to tell me about yourself and what you know. I’d love to post it here as a guest author. If you don’t want to write, but have information, then we can either record it or I can write it for you. I want good information here. Real information, real stories, from real people.

[contact-form-7]

 

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How To Take Care Of Saltwater Angelfish

Flame Angelfish ( Centropyge Loricula )Saltwater Angelfish Quick Care Facts:

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Environment: Varies by species
pH: Varies by species
KH: Varies by species
Diet: Omnivore
Breeding: Varies by species

Saltwater angelfish are a colourful species, popular with many aquarium owners. There are several species of marine angelfish, with most species generally reaching lengths of eight to 12 inches.

General Saltwater Angelfish environment

One important aspect of caring for saltwater angelfish is to make sure that the tank intended for them has been in use for at least three months before they are introduced. This ensures that the nitrogen cycle in their new home has been fully established. Ammonia and nitrite levels need to be checked regularly. In general terms, these fish prefer reef tank environments. The size of the tank can vary with the specific species of angelfish you have chosen. Smaller species may require a tank size of around 50 gallons.

Feeding your Saltwater Angelfish

Angelfish need a varied diet in order to thrive. While live foods such as brine shrimp often go down well, frozen scallops or krill will also generally work, too. Commercial foods such as flakes and pellets may also be suitable, but it is wise to check the requirements of your specific species. One crucial thing to remember is that angelfish need around 20 percent of their diet to be vegetable matter such as lettuce. A varied diet helps them stay healthy.

Breeding your Angelfish

Setting up the right tank environment is vital if you want your angelfish to breed. They need to feel comfortable and secure. Angelfish are pelagic breeders in the wild, meaning that they release their eggs into the ocean and let them drift. The biggest challenge facing captive breeders is keeping the eggs alive. All angelfish are born hermaphrodites, but will change sex as their environment alters. If you want your fish to breed, make sure you have a mixed population of smaller and larger specimens. The larger will become males and the smaller ones female. Maintaining a consistent day/night cycle in your aquarium will help your fish breed. Eggs will usually hatch 20 hours after spawning, and should be removed to a separate aquarium.

Saltwater Angelfish diseases

Angelfish are hardy, but can be prone to lateral line erosion, which can scar them. bacterial and protozoan diseases can be a risk if tank environment quality is not maintained. Edema, or bloat, can often prove fatal. The risk of all diseases falls if you pay careful attention to the quality of the environment in which the fish are living.

The post How To Take Care Of Saltwater Angelfish appeared first on Saltwater Fish Keeping.

        
 
 
   
 

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