Ribbon-cutting opens new school By Lyndsie Ferrell in The Mineral County Miner on Aug. 20, 2015 CREEDE- A large crowd of community members and visitors gathered in front of the new school in Creede to witness the ribbon-cutting ceremony on Saturday, ...

 

Ribbon-cutting opens new school and more...




Ribbon-cutting opens new school

Ribbon-cutting opens new school

By Lyndsie Ferrell in The Mineral County Miner on Aug. 20, 2015

CREEDE- A large crowd of community members and visitors gathered in front of the new school in Creede to witness the ribbon-cutting ceremony on Saturday, Aug. 15.

After almost a year and a half of construction, the community was finally able to walk through the doors of their new school and see what their combined efforts had brought to the area. School Board President John Howard addressed the crowd speaking on behalf of the school to thank everyone in the community for passing the bond when it came time to vote.

The old school was built in 1949 and has served the community until the building began to show signs of age. Potentially hazardous issues such as radon gas leaks and dangerous building materials were a concern for the safety of the students and staff. In 2013 school board members reached out to the community and asked for their help to fix the situation. When elections rolled around in November, the bill 3A was passed, and plans for the new school shifted into high gear.

Many of construction costs were taken care of due to the school being approved for the BEST grant that has helped build new schools state-wide . Howard did not forget to point out that though the BEST grant helped pay for the new school, it was the community in Creede that made the dream come true. With the help of Neenan Company out of Fort Collins, the building was made into a 21st Century, energy-efficient design that fits into the community it will be serving. Superintendent Buck Stroh thanked the community and the owner representative from Consillium Partners, Desi Navarro, who helped guide board members and the community through the many construction phases and everything that pertained to the new school.

Colorado Senator Larry Crowder was in attendance to present a Colorado flag and an American flag to the new school. “What this does is signify the fabric of the community,” said Crowder. The senator then gave the flags to Howard and thanked everyone for their continued support in helping educate the children in Mineral County for the 21st Century.

The building’s low profile and natural colors of outside surfaces helps the school blend into the vast mountain valley south of town. The position of the building’s entrances and windows were chosen in order to provide the most natural light throughout the day, cutting down on energy expenses. Window shades follow the rays of the sun by solar power and shift according to the time of day, in order to utilize the most natural light.

Walking into the school is a new experience all together. The front entryway was designed for safety and convenience, giving the front desk staff the chance to see who is entering the building something the office staff has never had before. While entering the front entryway a door leads off to the right, allowing the public access to the school/county library. The library is now connected with the Carnegie Library system in the Valley, giving library patrons and students access to thousands of books and programs.

The main part of the building is taken up by the community/lunch room. The high ceilings and open spaces, give a sense of being outside while inside. Students will have the opportunity to enjoy the room during school activities and lunch hours. The room is also equipped with a concession stand built into the far right corner where students and staff will be able to sell snacks for fundraisers, sporting events or other school activities.

Classrooms are equipped with dividers in the event the student population grows. The large classrooms can be divided into two smaller rooms if the need arises. The gym is also equipped with a divider, making it easy to host two games or sport practices at the same time. Hallways are lined with wooden accents providing a natural feel to the building. High windows are placed strategically throughout the halls to once again provide natural light. Flat screen TVs are set throughout the building in study nooks and can be used to refer to news, movies and informational pieces.

Students and staff gathered in a line near the door to their new school. Small hands held the ribbon on each side, while Howard donned the gigantic scissors to cut the ribbon and welcome the community insdie. Gratitude and excitement could be seen in the eyes of the students and staff as Howard cut the ribbon and opened the doors. The day was bright and clear and was soon filled with the laughter of children racing toward their new playground.

        
 

St. Charles Madras project underway

The Madras Pioneer | August 2015

St. Charles Madras project underway

Written by Holy M. Gill

$16 million renovation, addition

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ILLUSTRATION BY NEENAN CO. – The new entrance for St. Charles Madras will be on the east side of the building.

For nearly a decade, hospital officials — first from Mountain View Hospital, and more recently from St. Charles Madras — have been planning a major renovation at the local hospital.

Last week, the hospital finally broke ground on a $16 million project, which will include construction of a 21,737-square-foot addition, renovation of portions of the hospital, and an extension of the parking area.

The addition will feature a new emergency room, surgery department and imaging area, as well as a new entrance, increasing the hospital from 56,964 square feet to 78,701 square feet.

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HOLLY M. GILL – The eight participants in the groundbreaking for St. Charles Madras’ addition and renovation project last week included, from left: Michael Collins, of the Neenan Co.; Mack Gardner and Dan Schuette, St. Charles board members; Jeanie Gentry, St. Charles Madras CEO; Joe Sluka, St. Charles Health System CEO; Angel Davis, of the hospital’s nutrition department; and Greg Arquette, of Warm Springs, who provided Native American music for the event.

The hospital still has only one operating room, and the emergency room has only seven beds, separated by curtains, according to Jeanie Gentry, St. Charles Madras CEO. “We need probably double that.”

The imaging room is too small, and the lab is still located outside the hospital in a modular unit, she said, adding, “We’re finally breaking ground on something that’s going to address all those needs.”

Seven of the St. Charles Health System board members and the CEO, Joe Sluka, were on hand for the groundbreaking, as well as Michael Curtis, the vice president for health care for the Neenan Co., of Denver, Colo., Mountain View Hospital board members, hospital employees and community members.”

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HOLLY M. GILL – Michael Curtis

It isn’t so much a building project as it is a patient care project,” Gentry told those gathered for the Aug. 18 event.

The project will more than fulfill a key component of the asset transfer agreement between Mountain View Hospital and St. Charles Madras, which took effect Jan. 1, 2013, requiring St. Charles Health System to spend at least $10 million on hospital improvements.

“St. Charles has also invested a lot into the current building,” said Gentry. “When it’s done, we will have had an infusion of $20 million into our community.”

The Neenan Co., of Fort Collins, Colo., will serve as the architect and general contractor for the project, as it has on the new St. Charles Prineville hospital, which will open its doors Sept. 21, the same day Pioneer Memorial Hospital closes its doors.

Like that project, Gentry anticipates that about 25 percent of the workers on the St. Charles Madras project will also be local.

Construction will start inside the hospital, as the old rehabilitation therapy pool is converted into a new mechanical room.

“One of the next things is the maintenance shop in the back of the hospital has to be moved,” said Gentry. “It’s right on top of where part of the new building will be.”

The entire project is expected to be completed in about 18 months, which would mean early 2017.

When it’s complete, the main entrance for the hospital will be located on the east side, with access from Northeast A Street, while the ambulance entrance will be located on the west side, off Northeast 12th Street.

        
 

St. Charles set for move to new Prineville hospital

St. Charles set for move to new Prineville hospital

Big day is Sept. 21 – but first, public gets ‘sneak peek’
By KTVZ.com on Sept. 1, 2015

St Charles Prineville Exterior Renderings (4)
Artists rendering of St. Charles Prineville, the replacement for Pioneer Memorial Hospital that’s been two years in the making.

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – Two years ago, St. Charles Health System’s Board of Directors recognized Prineville was ready for a new hospital. The board approved the construction of a facility that was consistent with the nonprofit organization’s vision for health services in the region.

Now construction of that new hospital, St. Charles Prineville, is complete. The facility is scheduled to open on Monday, Sept. 21.

“This is such an exciting time,” said Jeanie Gentry, CEO of St. Charles Prineville and St. Charles Madras. “We’re just weeks away from opening a truly innovative facility that is designed to grow with the community for many years to come.”

Research conducted by St. Charles, Stroudwater Associates and The Neenan Company led to the design that is intended to improve access to care for patients while enhancing their care experience and providing better value for their health care dollars.

The $30 million health care campus includes a primary care and specialty physician clinic along with hospital services including inpatient beds, an emergency department, surgery suites, a laboratory, imaging services and much more.

Most nonclinical departments such as administration, clinical education and human resources will begin moving into their new space on Tuesday, Sept. 8, with clinical departments to follow starting Thursday, Sept. 17.

On Sept. 21 at 4 a.m., Pioneer Memorial Hospital will officially close at the same time St. Charles Prineville opens. The hand-off will be complete once all inpatients have been transferred from one facility to the other.

On that same day, St. Charles Family Care — which will also be located at the hospital campus —  will open with new expanded hours to better serve the community. The clinic will be open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The public is invited to a “Sneak Peek” celebration of St. Charles Prineville on Saturday, Sept. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Events will include self-guided tours of the hospital, food and entertainment, a 5K family fun run and much more.

For more information about the hospital move and the “Sneak Peek” day of events, visit StCharlesHealthCare.org.

Important dates to remember

• Sept. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the public is invited to a “Sneak Peek” celebration of St. Charles Prineville. Events will include self-guided tours of the hospital, food and entertainment, a 5K family fun run and much more.

• Sept. 21 at 4 a.m.,
Pioneer Memorial Hospital will officially close at the same time St. Charles Prineville opens. The hand-off will be complete once all inpatients have been transferred from one facility to the other.

About St. Charles Health System

St. Charles Health System, Inc., headquartered in Bend, Ore., owns and operates St. Charles Bend, Madras and Redmond, and leases and operates Pioneer Memorial Hospital. It also owns family care clinics in Bend, Madras, Prineville, Redmond and Sisters. St. Charles is a private, not-for-profit Oregon corporation and is the largest employer in Central Oregon with more than 3,400 caregivers. In addition, there are more than 350 active medical staff members and nearly 200 visiting medical staff members who partner with the health system to provide a wide range of care and service to our communities.

        
 

Hospital to break ground

Hospital to break ground

By Holly M. Gill in The Madras Pioneer on Aug. 12, 2015

A little more than 2 1/2 years after the St. Charles Health System acquired Mountain View Hospital through an asset transfer, the system is ready to break ground Aug. 18, on a promised addition and renovation project.

The public groundbreaking ceremony for the $16 million project is set for Tuesday, at 6 p.m., on the north side of the 49-year-old hospital at the rehabilitation entrance.

When St. Charles Health System took took over the hospital on Jan. 1, 2013, a key element in the acquisition agreement was the health system’s commitment to spend at least $10 million on hospital improvements. Last year, St. Charles approved a project which will include construction of a 21,737-square-foot addition, renovation of portions of the hospital, and an extension of the parking area.

With the addition of the new emergency, surgery and imaging area, as well as a new entrance, the hospital will increase from its existing 56,964 square feet to 78,701 square feet.

Jeanie Gentry, CEO of both St. Charles Madras and Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Prineville, said that St. Charles is in the process of finalizing its plans with the city of Madras.

The Neenan Co., of Fort Collins, Colo., will serve as the architect and general contractor for the project, as it has on the new St. Charles Prineville hospital, which will open its doors Sept. 21, the same day Pioneer Memorial Hospital closes its doors.

“They subcontract out most of the construction work,” said Gentry. “In Prineville, about 25 percent of the workers on that hospital were local, and that’s the same goal they have for the Madras project.”

Construction will start inside the hospital, as the old rehabilitation therapy pool is converted into a new mechanical room. “We haven’t used that probably for five years,” she said.

“One of the next things is the maintenance shop in the back of the hospital has to be moved,” said Gentry. “It’s right on top of where part of the new building will be.”

In the meantime, the site for the addition of the new emergency, surgery and imaging departments will be prepared. “The whole project will take about 18 months; we don’t have all the exact dates worked out yet,” she said.

“After those three departments move out of the old part of the building, there will be another phase where we’ll be renovating to put the new lab in the old part of the building, basically where imaging is right now,” she said.

The main entrance for the hospital will be located on the east side, with access from Northeast A Street. The ambulance entrance will be located on the west side, off Northeast 12th Street.

        
 

A Quality Crisis Leads to a National Business Ethics Award

Blueprints: Building the World Safely  |  July 2015
A TECHNICAL PUBLICATION OF ASSE’S CONSTRUCTION PRACTICE SPECIALTY


Quality Crisis Leads to a National Business Ethics Award
By Mike Stajduhar & Paul Gardzinski

Blueprints_image1It was Fall 2011. An issue emerged at school that had been recently designed and constructed by The Neenan Company. An outside structural engineer, hired by the school district, called for a structural review of the 1-year-old building after a gym wall moved a few inches. Neenan, a prestigious design-build firm in Colorado, was about to be shocked: Its reputation for integrated project delivery with quality and safety would be called into question.

Understanding the potential gravity of the situation, the senior management team initiated third party structural reviews on a few school projects that were under construction. Although Neenan continued to receive support from many clients, local news outlets picked up the story and concerns grew.

Immediately, the company commissioned comprehensive reviews of 94 projects. Company president Randy Myers met personally with many clients associated with these projects to assure them that issues or concerns would be addressed.


Neenan’s continued success in upgrading its quality management system can be traced to the methodical implementation of key performance indicators similar to the company’s safety processes.


“I remember reading the first article online initially but it didn’t brace me for the shock,” Myers explains. “Our reputation is key to our business, we have never let our clients down in the past and we weren’t going to start now. We reached out to our clients immediately about the situation and how it might affect them. The scary thing was not knowing the depth of the problem and whether we could survive the financial and reputation hits. I was resolved that we would never put ourselves in this position again.” Neenan turned to its insurance broker, Flood and Peterson, and insurance carrier, Zurich. Through this partnership, the company began the arduous task of assessing its quality system to identify and prioritize deficiencies. Neenan committed to revamping its processes, starting with implementation of structural peer reviews for every project going forward. Company leaders needed a road map to guide them through the implementation of a comprehensive, best-in-class quality management system, much as they had already done with safety.

In February 2012, Neenan committed to quality improvement and began using a self-assessment tool provided by Zurich to establish a baseline for the journey that was about to begin. As part of this process, the quality assurance team was reorganized to report directly to the chief operating officer.

Neenan, Flood and Peterson, and Zurich established a task force to meet monthly. For 2012, Neenan was on a quality program mission. “We brought in our partners at Zurich and Flood and Peterson to help us honestly assess our current processes and areas to focus,” Myers states. “While we were strong in some areas, we were mediocre or weak in others. We had monthly follow-up meetings to review our progress and ask questions to improve our processes.”

Blueprints_image2These meetings helped sustain momentum. The initial assessment identified several key areas that were in need of a best-in-class quality management system ( Figure 1). It was developed specifically for Neenan utilizing existing Zurich Risk Engineering tools and risk management expertise from Flood and Peterson. From this initial assessment, through collaborative task force meetings, Neenan identified and prioritized elements that would ensure steady and efficient progress to implement a redesigned quality system.

With a goal of full company implementation by January 2013, Neenan took 1 month to identify its quality program initiatives for design and construction phases while establishing timeline goals for each phase. These initiatives consisted of design tollgates, mock-ups, team submittal reviews, preinstallation meetings and first-in-place reviews.

Expectations and user documents were developed for each initiative over the next 6 months. Neenan’s Greg Bundy developed a web-based deficient work list tracking tool and Neenan chose six projects (user groups) to test the systems. Listening to requests from the user groups, the company developed an iPad app to track deficient work items. Neenan’s IT group continues to be an integral part in the development of the quality process tools.

Blueprints_image3The value of the testing phase for the new processes and tools exceeded everyone’s expectations. According to Mike Stajduhar, Neenan’s director of quality assurance, “Not only did the user groups provide input for continuous process improvements, it showed just what can be accomplished when we all work collaboratively towards a common goal.” When comparing historical owner punch list (deficient work items) data with early and consistent use of the app, the size of owner punch lists declined by 46%. The tool was working (Figure 2).

The complete quality program was rolled out to the company after 10 months, 2 months ahead of the original goal. Initially the roll out included the field, project management and project coordinator disciplines, then later the design and preconstruction disciplines. The 2012 quality program mission was accomplished.

Blueprints_image4In January 2013, five new projects were selected to utilize the new processes throughout all phases of design and construction. Neenan developed webbased tools to measure team participation in the new quality program during the first quarter of 2013. These tools were created to be shared with and accessed by everyone in the company. The quality program was locked and loaded after 15 months of hard work. The real world test was about to begin. The first project using the full quality process was completed in August 2013 and the initial results are promising. The project team surpassed intended participation goals and the owner’s punch list items decreased by another 50%. By reducing this punch list work, worker injury exposure was also reduced significantly (Figure 3).

Neenan’s continued success in upgrading its quality management system can be traced to the methodical implementation of key performance indicators similar to the company’s safety processes. These include: management support and commitment; widespread organizational involvement; pretask/project planning; training; dedicated quality/safety staff; field execution; subcontractor management; and performance measurements. New performance metrics are being developed and utilized to provide extra motivation and further increase continuous improvement efforts. This ties into the firm’s overall goal of having safety, quality and production fully integrated.

The Neenan Company received the 2013 American Business Ethics Award from the Foundation for Financial Service Professionals. Established in 1994, the award recognizes companies that exemplify high standards of ethical behavior in their everyday business conduct and in response to specific crises or challenges. Chosen from a group of 30 other companies across the U.S., the company received high marks for its “stand up, don’t cover up” philosophy, which guided the company to take care of its clients and create a best-in-class quality management system.

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Mike Stajduhar has more than 35 years’ experience in the construction industry and is director of quality assurance for The Neenan Company. He holds a B.S. in Industrial/Construction Management from Colorado State University, is an AIA professional affiliate and a member of ASHE.

Paul Gardzinski has been employed by The Neenan Company since 2000 and is responsible for the quality assurance program that prevents construction defects. He holds a B.S. in Architecture from Lawrence Technological University.

        
 
 
   
 

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