Have you always wanted to write a book but don't know where to start? Have you written a book and are wondering what now? Having trouble finishing that book or even getting it started? Are you having trouble finding a literary agent? A publisher? Have ...

 

Have You Always Wanted to Write a Book and Don’t Know Where to Start? and more...



Have You Always Wanted to Write a Book and Don’t Know Where to Start?

Have you always wanted to write a book but don’t know where to start?

Have you written a book and are wondering what now? Having trouble finishing that book or even getting it started? Are you having trouble finding a literary agent? A publisher? Have no idea how it all works? Need help with marketing that book? Are you a business owner or professional interested in stepping up your credibility, client list, sales? Being the author of a book can do that for you, instantly. Let’s have a conversation, I may be able to help.

Helping others achieve the dream of holding their own book in their hands is my passion.

Holding your own published book in your hand is a major life accomplishment. Seeing your own published book on a bookstore shelf is electrifying and being asked to sign your own published book for a reader is humbling and absolutely incredible!

So what exactly is a book/author coach?

A book coach is knowledgeable in all things writing, publishing and marketing. The most important thing your coach can offer is to provide you with the tools you need to feel confident and motivated to create the best and most successful manuscript possible, to make the best publishing decisions and to guide you in making the most effective marketing choices for you and your book.

My services are affordable and packages are available from as little as one session to sessions throughout the entire process.

Ghostwriting services are also available.

I enjoy the challenge of ghostwriting. It’s rewarding to be able to see into another person’s soul and to capture exactly what they wanted to say!

E-mail doreenb8@verizon.net For a free 1/2 hour consultation.

Doreen

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Writers Resistance…

 

The first Wednesday of every month is officially:

Insecure Writer’s Support Group Day #IWSG

Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your writing doubts and the fears you have or have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer – aim for a dozen new people each time.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

To join us, sign up here:

 

Visit our Facebook Page here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/IWSG13

Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!

March 7th Question: How do you celebrate when you achieve a writing goal/finish a story?

I do my best writing in the early morning hours. I’ve been struggling all winter with getting up when the alarm goes off and I’m seriously behind because of my snoozing. Last week I started facilitating a Resisting Happiness four-week-book study. The first sentence of the book basically says you can hit the snooze button and roll over, getting back to your dreams or you can get up and get busy making those dreams come true.

My book is titled Realize Your Writing Dreams. Did I need to read that book or what? I decided to give up my snooze button for lent and as hard as it still is to get out from under those covers I’ve been waking up on my own before the alarm goes off.

Once lent is over and this manuscript is finished I am going to celebrate by sleeping in for a week; only a week and then I’ll go right back to getting up with the sun.

I’ll probably celebrate by actually eating at the table with my family like a grown-up. When I’m in that writing zone I don’t like to stop not even for meals.

I’m really look forward to celebrating by reading a good book; seeing a good movie and a concert too!

If I’m being completely honest I’ll most likely celebrate by outlining my next project.

How do you celebrate? Do you struggle with resistance?

Happy Writing!

 

Be sure to visit the awesome co-hosts for the March 7 posting of the IWSG:

Mary Aalgaard, Bish Denham, Jennifer Hawes, Diane Burton, and Gwen Gardner!

I would love to see you on INSTAGRAM too!

http://www.instagram.com/DoreenMcGettigan

Leave me a link to your Instagram and/or Twitter in the comments!

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Insecure Writers Support Group…

It’s that time again! The first Wednesday of the month is Insecure Writers Support Group Day!

Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your writing doubts and the fears you have or have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer – aim for a dozen new people each time.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

To join us, sign up here:

http://www.insecurewriterssupportgroup.com/p/iwsg-sign-up.html

 

Visit our Facebook Page here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/IWSG13

Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!

I can’t believe this is my 701st Blog Post!

February 7th optional question: What do you love about the genre you write in most often?

This question got me thinking. I’ve written two memoirs and am doing final edits on another nonfiction book. I’ve also ghostwritten my share of nonfiction books. But ever since I was ten-years-old my plan was to write a historical fiction series and occasionally I get the opportunity to work on that dream.

What I love about nonfiction is the truth. Or should I say the authors’ truth because we all know truth is subjective. I think memoir is one of the best ways for us to learn of first-hand witness accounts and to understand historical events and how they affected actual people in their own words and to really get a feel for actual history.

I have always loved research and writing nonfiction involves a lot of research. On the other hand, research can suck up a lot of time so I have to keep myself on a tight scheduleJ

Before writing my first memoir I read one-hundred of them and that definitely helped me to develop a deep respect for those that are willing to tell some difficult, personal stories.

That said I still do love reading fiction…

How about you? Do you read the genre you write?

Be sure to stop by and thank the wonderful co-hosts for this month:

Stephen Tremp, Pat Garcia, Angela Wooldridge, Victoria Marie Lees, and Madeline Mora-Summonte!

Anthology Invite:

Bucks County Writers Group invites all writers to submit a short fiction story for a forthcoming anthology of (outer worldly, otherworldly, ghostly, angel, alien etc…stories.)

Writers can choose their own topics as long as they stay within the theme. The story can be fiction based on a real story.

The group will be marketing the Anthology and authors will be encouraged to create and/or participate in at least one marketing event.

Publication will be fall 2018

Think: ‘Do You Believe’

Word Length: 3500-5000 words per story.

Payment: $10.00 for each story chosen. $100.00 will be paid for the one entry chosen as the title story.

Infinity Publishing will publish the anthology in both paper back, digital and e-formats. It will be available for global distribution including book stores and libraries.

Deadline for submissions is February 28, 2018.

Submission Guidelines:

Story must be edited prior to submission. Entries must not have been published, including blog posts. All rights return to contributors six-months after publication.

Format:

Use a 1″ margin on all sides
Use a title page Don’t number the title page. Include story title, your short bio with any links you want published with your story, and your contact information Begin numbering with the first page of the text of the story.
Use a header on each page, including your name, the title of your story in all caps, and the page number.
Indent fives spaces for each new paragraph.
Double-space the entire text.
Use a standard font, 12-point type. Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier is fine.

Send your submission before January 31, 2018 to:

buckscountywriters@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Here We Go Again…

Happy New Year fellow insecure writers! Here we go again…

The first Wednesday of every month is officially:

Insecure Writer’s Support Group day #IWSG

Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your writing doubts and the fears you have or have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer – aim for a dozen new people each time.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

To join us, sign up here:

http://insecurewriterssupportgroup.com/p/iwsg-sign-up.html/p/iwsg-sign-up.html

Visit our Facebook Page here:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/IWSG13

Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!

For those of us that didn’t crush our writing goals in 2017 here we are with a brand new start to a brand new year and an opportunity to try again. I’m not beating myself up too bad, I didn’t complete all of my goals but I did complete most of them. I can’t wait to get started!

Back in August I squeezed a lemon a bit too hard and tore some ligaments in my thumb and hand. A cast for 6-weeks and steroid shots haven’t helped so I’m starting the year with surgery on my WRITING HAND! It hurts so I’m anxious to have it repaired but I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a nervous wreck. Hopefully it heals as quickly as the doc says it will.

How I  the world did I get to this age and not know to roll a tough lemon before squeezing? Ugh!

OPTIONAL #IWSG Day Question: What steps have you taken to put a schedule in place for your writing and publishing?

I have tried about every suggestion available and the basic truth is I schedule writing time in my planner and on my calendar and it has made a difference but I need to be better at sticking to that schedule. Switching my writing time from late at night to the first thing in the morning has helped.
Be sure to stop by and thank this months Co-Hosts:

Tyrean Martinson, The Cynical Sailor, Megan Morgan, Rachna Chhabria, and Jennifer Lane.

The first #IWSG Twitter pitch of the New Year:

Create a Twitter-length pitch for your completed and polished manuscript and leave room for genre, age, and the hashtag. On January 18, Tweet your pitch. If your pitch receives a favorite/heart from a publisher/agent check their submission guidelines and send your requested query.

Many writers have seen their books published from a Twitter pitch – it’s a quick and easy way to put your manuscript in front of publishers and agents.

Rules:

Writers may send out 1 Twitter pitch every 1 hour per manuscript.

Publishers/Agents will favorite/heart pitches they are interested in. Publishers can either Tweet basic submission guidelines or direct writers to their submission guidelines. (Writers, please do not favorite/heart pitches.)

No images allowed in pitches.

Pitches must include GENRE/AGE and the hashtag #IWSGPit

Ages:
#C – children’s
#MG – middle grade
#YA – young adult
#NA – new adult
#A – adult
Genres:
#AD – adventure
#CF – Christian fiction
#CO – contemporary
#F – fantasy
#H – horror
#HI – historical
#LF – literary fiction
#MCT – mystery/crime/thriller
#ME – memoir
#NF – non-fiction
#PB – picture book
#PN – paranormal
#R – romance
#SF – sci-fi
#WF – women’s fiction

Happy Writing,

Doreen

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Streetcar to Justice…

Preparing for this interview I was awed by the passion the author has for history and how that passion has fueled her impressive writing career.

Meet The Author

Amy is a New York Times Bestselling Author, and an American Library Association “Notable Book” and Peabody Award Winner. She is also a Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, USA Today and Publisher’s Weekly Bestselling Author.


Her books have been published by Harper Collins, Simon & Schuster, Random House, Kodansha, and Doubleday, among others. She has been represented by William Morris Agency (now William Morris Endeavor Entertainment) since 1991.

She is the author of two novels, Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women’s Literary Society and Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of Collier County, both published by Simon & Schuster’s Atria Books imprint, as well as seven nonfiction books including Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, a blockbuster bestseller which spawned a Broadway play and television film.

Amy also coauthored, Know Your Power: A Message to America’s Daughters with the first female speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, Rep. Nancy Pelosi.

She is a thirteenth-generation American whose ancestors fought for independence in the Revolutionary War.

She and her husband make their home at the New Jersey Shore.

The Book

Her latest work, Streetcar to Justice [1/02/2018] is her first middle-grade book and tells the all-but-forgotten story of Elizabeth Jennings, a black schoolteacher who refused to leave a segregated streetcar in Manhattan in 1854, setting into motion a historic court case and the first major step in ending segregation in public transportation in New York. The book is available wherever books are sold!

Book Trailer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qI57h4ogq44&feature=youtu.be

The Interview

Q– Your bio is so impressive and your family background is fascinating. Where did you grow up? Did you grow in a reading, writing or musical household? Do you have siblings? Do any of them write?

A– I was born in western Massachusetts but my dad was with General Electric so we moved several times. This included six years in Columbia, South Carolina when I was in grammar school. I’m the youngest of four children. I’m the only writer in the family except for a great-uncle who was the Paris correspondent for Billboard magazine during the 1920s and ‘30s, a job that sounds incredibly intriguing. My mom is a math person and Dad was an electrical engineer. Our house was filled with books and music growing up. And, my dad was a history enthusiast who shared that with me.

Q– Where do you make your home now?

A– My husband and I spend a fair amount of time in Berkshire County, Mass., and in Florida but home base is at the Jersey Shore, an hour south of Manhattan.

Q– What was the first book you had published? What was your journey to publication like for that first book?

A– My first book was “Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years,” a New York Times bestseller for more than two years. The book is an oral history of two centenarian sisters, Sadie and Bessie Delany, who were the daughters of a man born into slavery. The book, published in 1993, is still used in classrooms today. I have since written seven more nonfiction books and two novels. “Streetcar to Justice” is my tenth book.

From left: Sadie Delany, Amy and Bessie Delany at the sisters home in Mt. Vernon

I never set out to become an author. I was a newspaper reporter, and I wrote a feature story about the then-unknown Delany Sisters for The New York Times. My story was read by a book publisher who contacted me and asked if I wanted to write a book on the sisters. So that’s how I became an author. I sometimes call myself an “accidental author.”

Q– Tell us about the movie, “Having Our Say.” How did the project come about and what was the production process like?

A– In 1995, the book was adapted to the Broadway stage, and, in 1999, for an award-winning CBS Sunday Night Movie. I worked on both the stage and film productions as an advisor to the producers. My role was to make sure the adaptations were accurate. For the film, the producers decided to add me as a character, and my role was performed by the famed actress Amy Madigan. It was a surreal experience to watch her on the set.

Q– You co-authored a book with speaker Pelosi? How did that project come about and tell us please, what is the Speaker like in real life?

A– Yes, I was Speaker Pelosi’s co-author. The book was “Know Your Power: A Message to America’s Daughters” and it was published in 2008 by Doubleday. Speaker Pelosi was looking for a co-author and somehow my name came up. As the first female Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, she is a historic figure and if there is one thing I love, it is history. She was an absolute delight to work with, very considerate of my time, just lovely in every way. When she learned it was my birthday, she sang happy birthday to me on the phone.

Q– What is your writing process like today? Do you write from an outline? Do you schedule writing time? Describe your writing space?

A– I’m not a fan of outlines. I leave small notepads all over the house, and when an idea pops into my head, I write it down. Actually, some of my best ideas have come to me in my sleep. There have been times when I did my best writing late at night. This was true with my book, “Strong Medicine Speaks: A Native American Elder Has Her Say,” an oral history of a Lenape matriarch and mother of a Chief. For some reason, I tend to write fiction in the morning and nonfiction at night. I have no idea why. My writing space is a room on the ground-floor of our house. I have two computers, one for my work and one for the outside world. My desk is enormous and usually covered with notes, files, and books. Between book projects, I organize my home office.

Q– What is your favorite writing snack and drink?

A– Ha! That’s an easy one. Coffee. And I never eat or snack when I’m writing.

Q– You started writing back when we used those things called typewriters and through the years have seen many changes to the way we write, edit, publish and market books.  Were the changes difficult for you and what are some pros and cons back then versus today?

A– Yes, there have been a lot of changes, and there are certainly pros and cons, but basically I feel that what I do – writing – hasn’t changed one iota. A good story is still a good story. Perhaps the biggest change for me is that through the Internet and social media, I am now able to interact with my fans much more quickly and easily.

Q– Congratulations on the release of your first middle-grade book, “Streetcar to Justice: How Elizabeth Jennings Won the Right to Ride in New York.” How did you research this project? Did you speak to Elizabeth Jennings relatives?

A– I had been researching this story as a hobby of sorts for twenty years. I can’t tell you how many hours I spent at the New York Public Library, both the main branch but also the Schomburg in Harlem, along with other research institutions such as the Museum of the City of New York. As for Elizabeth Jennings’s relatives, she was not survived by any direct descendants, so there was no one to interview. I relied on historical documents including black newspapers that went out of business many, many years ago.

Q– What was the ‘thing’ about Elizabeth Jennings and her story that hooked you? That moment you knew you would tell her story?

A– I found out about her because I was nosy about an old, abandoned house in the neighborhood where my husband and I used to live in Ossining, N.Y. I was a little obsessed with the house and decided to find out about it. I was shocked to discover that it had once belonged to Chester A. Arthur, a Manhattan attorney who later became the 21st President of the United States. I did some research on him and learned that his first big case was Jennings v. Third Avenue Railroad Company. That’s how I first heard of Elizabeth Jennings. When I realized the importance of the case and that she had been a celebrated figure in New York, I decided that this was one of those all-but-forgotten stories that deserved to be told. The similarity to Rosa Parks – except it took place 100 years earlier – is fascinating.

Q– What do you hope the take away from this book will be for middle grade students?

A– I want them to know that history is not set in stone, and that the text books they are reading don’t have the final word. There are many stories, and perspectives, that are forgotten or overlooked. I want them to “meet” Elizabeth Jennings, a courageous and inspirational American. And I want them to have a better understanding of slavery and Jim Crow in America than I did when I was growing up – that it took place in the North as well as the South. The fact that there were streetcars with signs that read, “Colored People Allowed In The Car” in Manhattan is not something many people know, but they should.

I highly recommend this book for your eight to twelve-year-olds and hope you will share!

For more information on Amy Hill Hearth visit her website:

http://www.amyhillhearth.com

Bibliography

  • Delany, Sarah L. and A. Elizabeth Delany with Amy Hill Hearth. Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years. New York: Kodansha America, 1993; Bantam Doubleday Dell paperback, 1994.
  • Delany, Sarah L. and A. Elizabeth Delany with Amy Hill Hearth. The Delany Sisters’ Book of Everyday Wisdom. New York: Kodansha America, 1994.
  • Delany, Sarah L. with Amy Hill Hearth, On My Own at 107: Reflections on Life Without Bessie. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco/Harper Collins, 1997.
  • Hearth, Amy Hill. In a World Gone Mad: A Heroic Story of Love, Faith and Survival. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2001.
  • Hearth, Amy Hill. The Delany Sisters Reach High. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2004. Children’s biography of the Delany Sisters, illustrated by Tim Ladwig.
  • Hearth, Amy Hill. ‘Strong Medicine’ Speaks: A Native American Elder Has Her Say: an Oral History. New York: Atria/Simon & Schuster, 2008.
  • Pelosi, Nancy with Amy Hill Hearth. Know Your Power: A Message to America’s Daughters. New York: Doubleday, 2008.
  • Hearth, Amy Hill. Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women’s Literary Society. New York: Atria/Simon&Schuster, Nov. 2012.
  • Hearth, Amy Hill. Miss Dreamsville and the Lost Heiress of Collier County. New York Atria Books/Simon & Schuster September 2015.
  • Hearth, Amy Hill. Streetcar to Justice. Harper Collins January 2018.

 

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