As I wrote earlier this week on Free Technology for Teachers, Google Calendar keeps my life on schedule. I use Google Calendar for keeping track of everything from keeping track of the classes I'm teaching to remembering when the babysitter is ...

 

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Google Calendar Tips for New Users and more...




Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Google Calendar Tips for New Users

As I wrote earlier this week on Free Technology for Teachers, Google Calendar keeps my life on schedule. I use Google Calendar for keeping track of everything from keeping track of the classes I’m teaching to remembering when the babysitter is available. Once you understand it, you’ll find that it runs your life too. Understanding how to use Google Calendar is an essential part of making the transition to G Suite for Education. In the video embedded below I provide five tips for new Google Calendar users.

 

Learn even more about Google Calendar and G Suite in Getting Going With G Suite. The next course begins on June 1st.  The course carries the option to earn three graduate credits.

Here are the week’s most popular posts on FreeTech4Teachers.com:
1. 7 Blogging Tools for Teachers Compared and Ranked
2. 5 Google Calendar Tips for New Users
3. 21 Real World Math Lessons for High School Students
4. DocsTeach Adds New Analysis Activities for Students
5. How to Disable Google Drive Email Notifications
6. Augmented Reality vs. Virtual Reality
7. How to Create Gmail Filters

Looking for a keynote or workshop? Click here to learn about my professional development services.

 

Coming in June – Four Online PD Opportunities With Me

Last summer more than 200 people joined me for online professional development. This summer is shaping up to have even more people earn professional development hours and graduate credits through my online courses. The next section of courses is going to begin ten days from now. A description of each course, it’s dates and times, and registration links are included below. If you’re a subscriber to the Practical Ed Tech newsletter be sure to use the discount code “subscriber” when you register.

Getting Going With G Suite
Getting Going With G Suite is a webinar series designed for teachers and administrators who are new to using Google Apps for Education. Getting Going With G Suite is a five week course covering everything you need to know to integrate Google Drive, Google Classroom, Google Calendar, and Google Sites into your practice.  Three graduate credits are available for the course through my partnership Midwest Teachers Institute and Calumet College of St. Joseph. Graduate credits require an additional fee and completion of weekly assignments.  The next course starts on June 1st at 7pm EDT. Register here.

Teaching History With Technology
In Teaching History With Technology you will learn how to develop engaging and challenging learning activities through the use of tools like Google Earth and Maps, video production tools, primary source databases, and how to help your students become better researchers. This course features three interactive online meetings along with a discussion forum in which you can further interact with me and your classmates. The cost of the course is $97 including access to the live sessions, recordings of the webinars, handouts, and PD certificate. The next course begins on May 31st at 3pm EDT. Register here.

From Blog to Job – A Teacherpreneur Jumpstart
I’ve been earning money through my blog for eight years. I’ll teach you how to do it too! In this four week course I’ll give you the blueprints for developing an online presence through which you can earn money. All the questions that you’ve always wanted to ask about making money through blogs and social media will be answered for you in this course. Learn more and register here. The next course begins on June 4th at 7pm EDT.

Blogs & Social Media for Teachers & School Leaders
Blogs and Social Media for Teachers and School Leaders is a three week webinar series during which teachers and school administrators will learn the how to choose the best blogging platform for their situations, how to set-up a blog for classroom and school-wide use, and learn about strategies on how to manage blogs in classroom and school-wide settings. Participants will also learn how to avoid the mistakes that often lead to blogging endeavors being abandoned.  After establishing blogs we’ll jump into using social networks like Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to reach out to parents, students, and other members of school communities. The next course begins June 6th at 7pm EDT. Register here.

 

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – 5 Ways to Use Padlet in School

Padlet is a versatile, collaborative tool that I’ve been using for years with students in my classroom and teachers in my workshops. Over the last couple of weeks Padlet added some new features including an option for sorting notes and an option for creating flowcharts. Given that Padlet has new features, it’s a good time to update my list of five good ways to use Padlet in school.

Padlet for group research and discussion:
A few years ago I showed my special education students a short (18 minutes) video about cultural changes that took place in the US during the 1920’s. After the video we discussed what they saw. Then I had students search online for other examples of cultural change in the 1920’s. When they found examples they put them onto a Wallwisher (Padlet’s previous name) wall that I projected onto a wall in my classroom. The wall started with just text being added to the wall and quickly progressed to YouTube videos being added to the wall. Once every student had added a video to the wall we stopped, watched the videos, and discussed them.

Padlet as a showcase of your students’ work:
If your students are creating digital portfolios, creating slideshows, or producing videos you could use Padlet to display all of your students’ best work on one page. Create the wall, call it something like “my best work this year,” and have your students post links to their works.

Padlet Mini as a bookmarking tool:
Padlet Mini is a Chrome extension that you can use to bookmark websites. When you click the Padlet Mini extension in your browser you will be presented with the option to save to one of your existing walls or create a new Padlet wall. Click here for a video on using Padlet Mini.

Padlet for Making Flowcharts
Padlet’s new flowchart option makes it easy to make a flowchart from a series of notes. Have students use this option to demonstrate understanding of a concept like the water cycle.

Padlet as a KWL chart:
Padlet can be used to create a KWL chart that students can contribute to anonymously (or not anonymously if you want them to sign-in). Create a wall, share the link, and ask students to share what they know and what they want to know about a topic. If you allow anonymous posting you might get contributions from shy students who might not otherwise speak-up in class. Of course, if you allow anonymous commenting you should have a conversation with your students about what an appropriate comment looks like. (You could also turn on moderation and approve all notes before they appear). The new notes sorting option makes it easy to rearrange notes on a grid.

 

Here are the week’s most popular posts from FreeTech4Teachers.com:
1. 7 Ways to Use Google Keep in Your Classroom
2. 5 Ways to Show YouTube Videos Without Related Content
3. 10 Ways to Use Google Earth in Your Classroom
4. How to Create a Flowchart on Padlet
5. Screencast-o-Matic Now Offers Background Music
6. Cite It In – A Free Tool for Creating Reference Citations
7. Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp & BYOD Camp Discounts Extended

Looking for a keynote or workshop? Click here to learn about my professional development services.

I am currently offering five online courses:

 

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – How to Annotate Images on Chromebooks

Google Keep is a versatile tool that can be used for everything from simple bookmarking to collaborative task management to image annotation. In fact, Google Keep provides one of the simplest ways to annotate images on Chromebooks and Android devices. Annotating images is handy when you find yourself needing to highlight portions of an image or to point out features of a diagram for your students. Or you may want students to do the same. For example, in a photography class you may have students mark an image to illustrate use of lighting and framing.  In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to download images to a Chromebook and how to then annotate them by using Google Keep. And don’t forget that you can now quickly access Google Keep notes within Google Docs.

 

Here are the week’s most popular posts from FreeTech4Teachers.com:
1. 7 Google Product Updates You Might Have Missed in April
2. How to Create a Google Classroom With a Gmail Account
3. Kahoot Announces New Windows 10 Apps
4. Check123 – A Video Encyclopedia
5. 5 Good Resources for Teaching and Learning About World War II
6. 5 Resources for Learning About Aviation – How Airplanes Fly
7. Chromebook Camp & BYOD Camp Discounts Extended

Looking for a keynote or workshop? Click here to learn about my professional development services.

I am offering five different online courses over the next four months.

 

Discounts Extended for Chromebook Camp and BYOD Camp

Every summer for the last five years teachers from all over the world have joined me in Maine for the Practical Ed Tech Summer Camps. Due to a couple of people having to cancel their registrations, I’ve re-opened sales for early bird registrations.

The Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp will be held on July 20th and 21st. The BYOD Camp will be held the following week on July 27th and 28th. Here’s an explanation of the differences between the two.

 

A list of Practical Ed Tech Summer Camp FAQs is available here.

 
 
   
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