One of the long-standing complaints about Google Slides is that there isn't a way to add audio to the slides. That's not entirely the case, but the process isn't as straight-forward as you would hope it would be. To add music to Google Slides you first ...

 

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Add Audio to Google Slides and more...




Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Add Audio to Google Slides

One of the long-standing complaints about Google Slides is that there isn’t a way to add audio to the slides. That’s not entirely the case, but the process isn’t as straight-forward as you would hope it would be. To add music to Google Slides you first need to find a YouTube video that contains music that is Creative Commons licensed. The best option, is to use a video that you own and that has music you have the rights to use. Once you’ve found a video then you can insert it into your Google Slides. Shrink the video to the smallest possible size so that it’s hard for viewers to see. Finally, use the video options menu in Google Slides to have the music video automatically start playing when you advance the slide.

In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to add music to Google Slides.

 

This topic and many like it will be covered in depth at the Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp on July 20th and 21st. 

Here are the week’s most popular posts on FreeTech4Teachers.com:
1. How to Add Music to Google Slides
2. Hone Geography Skills With These Fun Games
3. Madmagz – Collaboratively Create Online Magazines
4. Yes, You Can Restrict Messages in G Suite
5. Use Socrative to Create Quiz Games That Accept Short Answers
6. YouTube Is Removing Annotations Option – Try This Instead
7. Three Audio Slideshow Projects for Teaching Basic Video Production

Join me this summer for the Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp or the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp. Register early and save $50. Group discounts are also available.

 

A New Online PD Series – Ed Tech Tuesdays

In late 2016 and earlier this year I hosted a series of one-hour webinars on Wednesdays. Those webinars proved to be popular as half of them sold out. Starting this week I’m offering a similar series that will be held on Tuesdays at 4pm Eastern Time (recordings will be available to those who cannot attend live sessions). The first webinar in the series is Fun With Formative Assessments.

Practical Ed Tech Tuesdays is a series of one-hour webinars designed to give you practical ideas that you can use in your classroom right away.

Each webinar will provide you with five concrete ideas that you can use as your own in your classroom. You will learn how to use the free ed tech tools necessary to conduct each activity by participating in each webinar. Unlike many webinars in which you just sit back and watch, in these webinars you will have an opportunity to participate in hands-on activities as if you were a student in my classroom. All webinars take place at 4pm EST. If scheduling doesn’t allow you to participate live, don’t worry because every webinar is recorded and emailed to everyone who registers.

Individual webinar registration is just $20 including the live session, the recording, handouts, and a PD certificate option.

Ed Tech Tuesday topics and dates:

Fun With Formative Assessments – March 28th

Google Forms & Sheets for Beginners – April 4th

Keeping Track With Google Keep & Calendar – April 11th

Quick & Powerful Video Projects – April 18th

 PD Certificates will be available to those who attend the live session webinars.

 

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Zero Noise Classroom Offers a Timer & Noise Meter

Zero Noise Classroom provides a countdown timer and a noise meter into one convenient Chrome app. When you launch Zero Noise Classroom you can set the countdown timer and adjust the goal for the volume of noise in your classroom. You will also set a goal for a percentage of the time that can exceed the maximum volume. When the countdown timer expires a chime sounds and the percentage of time above the volume limit is displayed. Learn more about Zero Noise Classroom in my video embedded below.

 

Here are the week’s most popular posts on FreeTech4Teachers.com:
1. 5 Ways to Show YouTube Videos Without Related Content
2. Google Team Drives Now Available
3. 7 Great Tools for Creating Flipped Lessons from Existing Videos
4. How to Use Zero Noise Classroom
5. Formatically Helps Students Properly Format Essays
6. Create Screencast Videos on Chromebooks – Three Good Options
7. Thunkable – Design and Publish Your Own Apps

Join me this summer for the Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp or the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp. Early registration and group discounts are available.

 

Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp FAQs

This summer I will be hosting the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp on July 27th and 28th in Portland, Maine. Discounted early registration is still available. In the video embedded below my daughter, Isla, joins me to answer a few frequently asked questions regarding the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp.

 

 

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Two Great Ways to Create Storytelling Websites

If a picture tells a thousand words, five or six pictures tells five or six thousand words. Assembling five or six favorite pictures is a great way to get students thinking about telling and writing a personal story. Similarly, gathering fix or six pictures representative of an event can be a good way to get students thinking about the whole event. Your students can do this with slides or an audio slideshow. Another way to have students gather, display, and write about pictures is to have them create simple webpages designed for storytelling. There are two excellent platforms that students can use to create simple storytelling websites.

Canva is a great tool for creating all types of graphics and slides. A few months ago Canva introduced the option to publish your designs as simple, stand-alone webpages. If your students insert their own pictures into a slide deck template or an infographic template in Canva, they can then publish that template as a stand-alone webpage. All Canva templates can be modified to include as much or as little text as you want to use. Watch the following short video to learn more about publishing Canva templates.

 

Adobe Spark might be best known in education circles for the great video creation tool that it contains. But Adobe Spark also has an excellent tool for creating simple webpages for telling stories. Use the “Page” option in Adobe Spark to craft a simple webpage that displays your favorite pictures and some text. Take a look at my sample page here. Watch my video below to learn how to use the “Page” tool in Adobe Spark.

 

Digital storytelling will be a significant part of both Practical Ed Tech Summer Camps this July. Early registration discounts are available until the end of this month.

Here are this week’s most popular posts from FreeTech4Teachers.com:
1. 22 Videos That Can Help Students Improve Their Writing
2. Zero Noise Classroom – A Timer and Noise Meter in One
3. 12 Ways to Create Videos On Chromebooks
4. Create Comic Strips in Google Slides
5. Storymap JS – Tell Stories With Maps
6. How to Create Strong Passwords
7. Three Good Tools for Creating Screenshots on Chromebooks

Join me this summer for the Practical Ed Tech Chromebook Camp or the Practical Ed Tech BYOD Camp. Early registration and group discounts are available.

 
 
   
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