This post was updated March 28 at 6:10 p.m. to add high-res, zoomable images. For the last couple of weeks, collectors have been noticing the lack of images of the 2017 American Liberty high-relief gold coin on the Mint's product schedule. As the ...

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Mint adds American Liberty high-relief photos to library; announces release of 2017 Proof sets on March 29 and more...

Mint adds American Liberty high-relief photos to library; announces release of 2017 Proof sets on March 29

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This post was updated March 28 at 6:10 p.m. to add high-res, zoomable images.

For the last couple of weeks, collectors have been noticing the lack of images of the 2017 American Liberty high-relief gold coin on the Mint’s product schedule. As the release dates approached for the coins preceding it on the calendar—the Boys Town commemoratives, the 2017 Proof Set, and the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site quarters—their photos appeared in the normal manner. When the American Liberty’s turn came, the Mint skipped over it and added photos of the next two products on the April schedule: the ATB quarters Uncirculated set and the Frederick Douglass three-coin set. That left the calendar complete except for the one glaring omission.

It isn’t unheard-of for a product to be unillustrated 10 days ahead of its release—but given that the American Liberty coin is the Mint’s highlight of 2017, as well as being an expensive item that one would expect to be...

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Proof rendition of American Silver Eagle goes on sale March 23

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This post was updated on March 21 at 6:30 p.m. to correct the term “Enhanced Proof.” Although ASEs with the Enhanced finish are sometimes referred to as Proofs or Specimens, they were marketed by the Mint in the spring of 2013 as having an “Enhanced Uncirculated” finish.


(Washington)—The United States Mint will begin accepting orders for the 2017 American Eagle 1-ounce silver Proof coin (17EA) on March 23 at noon Eastern Time.

The obverse of the ASE features Adolph A. Weinman’s full-length figure of Liberty in full stride, enveloped in folds of the flag, with her right hand extended and branches of laurel and oak in her left. Its reverse features former Mint sculptor-engraver John Mercanti’s heraldic eagle bearing a shield, with an olive branch in its right claw and arrows in its left.

American Eagle 1-ounce silver Proofs are struck on .999 fine silver blanks and bear the W mintmark, indicating their production at the U.S. Mint at West Point. Each...

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2017 palladium American Eagle design mock-ups revealed

Mockup of the proposed design for the 2017 palladium American Eagle coin. (U.S. Mint photo, via Coin World)

Mockup of the proposed design for the 2017 palladium American Eagle coin. (U.S. Mint photo, via Coin World)

This post was modified on the evening of March 17 to add the image-comparison slider, and to modify the language about the obverse design, which suggested a more exact replication than actually exists.

In an article by Paul Gilkes, Coin World has shared U.S. Mint mock-ups (shown above) for the 2017 palladium bullion coins. The obverse closely follows (with a few subtle differences) the classic Winged Liberty dime obverse by Adolph A. Weinman. The word LIBERTY encircles the field above the effigy, while IN.GOD / WE.TRUST is placed in the lower left field, the designer’s initials in the lower right field, and the date, 2017, below Liberty’s neck. The matte gray surface of the mockup makes it easier to see certain details that are often obscured by wear or glare on the tiny silver coins: for example, the horizontal braid under the back of Liberty’s...

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Palladium American Eagle design discussion postponed

A 1916 Winged Liberty obverse and the AIA gold medal reverse (with rim added). The final coin design must also include "United States of America," plus the denomination, weight, and fineness of the coin.

Illustration of a 1916 Winged Liberty obverse and the AIA gold medal’s reverse (with rim added). The final coin design must also include “United States of America,” plus the denomination, weight, and fineness of the coin, and of course the correct date, 2017.

Tomorrow, March 15, the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) was scheduled to meet in Washington, D.C., to discuss the designs for several U.S. Mint coin and medal products. Mother Nature had other ideas, however, and slammed the Eastern seaboard with a nasty winter storm that has shut down cities, airlines, and public transportation in D.C. and elsewhere, so the meeting has been postponed.

One of the items to be discussed was an all-new palladium bullion coin. The idea has been around for years, making its first significant waves on September 22, 2010, when Rep. Dennis Rehberg (R-Mont.) introduced HR 6616, the American Eagle Palladium Bullion Coin Act. A representative of the district that...

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Mint releases Boys Town Centennial commemorative coins

(Washington, D.C.)—Today, the United States Mint released three commemorative coins to celebrate Boys Town’s 100 years of service to children and families.

“This is such an exciting time at Boys Town as we release the designs of these symbolic coins,” said Father Steven Boes, Boys Town national executive director. “These coins will help us commemorate and celebrate the outstanding work that has been done by our organization over the last 100 years.”

The Mint will issue a maximum of 50,000 five-dollar gold, 350,000 one-dollar silver, and 300,000 half-dollar clad coins with designs that represent Boys Town and its rich history. Founded in 1917, Boys Town is one of the largest nonprofit childcare organizations in the country and serves 500,000 thousand children each year.

Pricing for the coins, which is as follows, includes surcharges that are authorized to be paid to Boys Town to carry out its cause of caring for and assisting children and families in...

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