International Falls, MN — The United States Mint joined the National Park Service today to launch the America the Beautiful Quarters Program coin honoring Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. It is the third America the Beautiful Quarters coin issued ...

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United States Mint launches America the Beautiful Quarters Program coin honoring Voyageurs National Park quarter and more...

United States Mint launches America the Beautiful Quarters Program coin honoring Voyageurs National Park quarter

A crowd of 600 people witnesses the June 14, 2018, ceremonial launch of the Voyageurs National Park quarter in International Falls, Minn. The coin is the 43rd release in the United States Mint America the Beautiful Quarters Program. U.S. Mint photo by Sharon McPike.

International Falls, MN — The United States Mint joined the National Park Service today to launch the America the Beautiful Quarters Program coin honoring Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. It is the third America the Beautiful Quarters coin issued in 2018 and the 43rd release in the series.

Hover to zoom.

This latest quarter’s reverse (tails) design depicts a common loon with a rock cliff in the background. Inscriptions are VOYAGEURSMINNESOTA, the year 2018, and E PLURIBUS UNUM.

The obverse (heads) design depicts the 1932 restored portrait of George Washington by John Flanagan. Inscriptions are UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, LIBERTY, IN GOD WE TRUST, and the denomination is QUARTER DOLLAR. A digital image of...

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The CCAC and the 2020 and 2021 America the Beautiful quarters: Salt River Bay National Historical Park

Background photo by Agnosticpreacherskid.

Article 4 of 7

Previous: Weir Farm National Historic Site. Next: Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park.

The outstanding Salt River Bay portfolio benefited from designs with bold, singular, primary devices that immediately draw the eye—a conch shell, a turtle, a mangrove tree. I like that approach because it helps to make a coin memorable. Thinking back to the Frank Church River of No Return wilderness coin (which will be minted in 2019): I supported the design that had a big, bold, front-facing portrait of a wolf. Kids would see that and they would all start checking their piggy banks and pocket change to find “the wolf quarter.” There would be no risk of it being just one more coin that you could describe as “the one with the mountains.” All of the Salt River Bay designs have that same type of boldness.

As an interesting sidebar: none of the designs directly illustrate the historical aspect of this historical park....

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The CCAC and the 2020 and 2021 America the Beautiful quarters: Weir Farm

Background photo by Agnosticpreacherskid.

Article 3 of 7

Previous: National Park of American Samoa. Next: Salt River Bay National Historical Park.

Weir Farm inspired another portfolio with many beautiful works of draftsmanship. The Mint’s artists captured the themes the CCAC and Weir Farm’s liaisons discussed in a telephone meeting in October 2017, regarding the site’s connection of art with the natural landscape. As the historic site’s officers told us, they’re faced with a challenge when people first hear the name “Weir Farm”—this is not an agricultural farm but a “National Park for the Arts,” with historic studios and cultivated landscapes where artists today can paint in the open air.

One concern I had, as I looked at these remarkable sketches for the Weir Farm coin, is that they might not translate well to the one-inch “canvas” of a quarter dollar. They would make wonderful large-diameter medals and would be well served by the three-inch silver planchet...

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U.S. Mint sales report: Week ending June 10, 2018

This U.S. Mint numismatic sales report covers the week ending June 10, 2018. The Mint’s best-selling product this week was once again the 2018 American Silver Eagle one-ounce Uncirculated coin (18EG). It sold 15,251 units. In second place is the 2018 U.S. Mint Proof Set (18RG), with 5,159 units sold, jumping up from fourth place last week. The third best-selling item this week was again the 2018 Silver Proof Set (18RH), with 4,316 sold. It’s followed by the 2018 U.S. Mint Uncirculated Set (18RJ), with 3,267 individual units sold; and the 2018 American Silver Eagle one-ounce Proof coin (18EA), with 1,828 sold.

The week also saw some downward adjustments on the 2018 World War I Silver $1 Proof Coin & Medal Sets (-268 overall) and are still marked “currently unavailable” on the Mint’s website. Those still interested in acquiring one or more sets, and who aren’t worried about whether they could grade at 69 or 70, should sign up for the Mint’s e-mail notifications to...

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The CCAC and the 2020 and 2021 America the Beautiful quarters: National Park of American Samoa

Background photo by Agnosticpreacherskid.

Article 2 of 7

Previous: Introduction. Next: Weir Farm.

Many of the design proposals in the National Park (American Samoa) portfolio are nicely drafted. Some are almost photographic in their detail.

This isn’t necessarily a strength when it comes to medallic sculpture.

Fine detail can be a challenge to translate into coin form, especially when the coin is as small as a U.S. quarter dollar. Take a look in your pocket change at a recent example: The 2017 Ozark Riverways quarter shows Alley Mill, a steel roller mill built in 1894, which visitors can tour today. Seen in the three-inch America the Beautiful silver coin, the design is beautiful, with a richly detailed view of the trees, running water, and rocks surrounding the mill. In its sketches, in enlarged printouts, on your computer screen, it works very elegantly. However, on a one-inch coin, it’s much less successful—visually it becomes a flour mill and a blur of landscape. We can...

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