The government and treasury of the Falkland Islands have launched (11th April) new crown coins which remember the 65th anniversary (or Sapphire Jubilee) of the coronation of HM Queen Elizabeth II, which took place on the 2nd June 1953. The-then Princess ...

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Falkland Islands: New blue titanium crown coins salute sapphire anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II and more...

Falkland Islands: New blue titanium crown coins salute sapphire anniversary of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II

The government and treasury of the Falkland Islands have launched (11th April) new crown coins which remember the 65th anniversary (or Sapphire Jubilee) of the coronation of HM Queen Elizabeth II, which took place on the 2nd June 1953.

The-then Princess Elizabeth acceded to the throne at the age of 25 upon the death of her beloved father, King George VI (1894–1952), who reigned from 1936 to the 6th February 1952. She learned that she had become Queen of Great Britain while en-route to Australia as she was to represent her father on an official visit since the ailing King was unable to travel. The sad news was told to her by her husband HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, while they were stopping over in Kenya. The royal couple then made arrangements to return to London immediately. Upon her touch-down at Heathrow Airport, the new Queen was met by her new ministers of state, who all bowed to their new sovereign, as she had stepped onto British soil for the first time as Queen. It was this moment which hailed the start of what would become the longest-ever reign of an English or British sovereign, now having entered her 66th year.

The Queen’s coronation took place more than a year later because of the tradition that holding such an event is inappropriate during the official period of mourning that follows the death of a monarch, in addition to the time it takes to actually organise such a major royal event. A total of 8,251 guests attended the ceremony with 129 nations and territories being officially represented. The service itself began at 11:15 in the morning and lasted almost three hours, which is now remembered as a breakthrough for the history of broadcasting since the ceremony was the first service to be televised.

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The coin is produced by the Pobjoy Mint at their facilities in Surrey and on behalf of the treasury of the Falkland Islands government. The coins are issued in sterling silver, cupro-nickel, and befittingly, as a sapphire-tinted titanium crown coin in honour of the coronation’s sapphire anniversary year. The reverse design, which is shared on both versions, includes the royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom which are used by Her Majesty in her official capacity as monarch of the United Kingdom. The coat of arms features the lion, representing England, and the unicorn, representing Scotland. The motto of English monarchs Dieu et mon Driot (“God and my Right”) which has descended to the present royal family can be seen below as well as the motto Honi soit qui mal y pense (“Shame on he who thinks evil”), which is shown on the garter circlet which surrounds the crest. The royal coat of arms that appears on the coin has been taken from Priors Gate at Winchester Cathedral. The pattern that surrounds the coat of arms replicates the pattern created on Her Majesty’s coronation gown which was designed by British fashion designer Norman Hartnell and consisted of white satin embroidered with the emblems of the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth in gold and silver thread.

The obverse includes an effigy of HM Queen Elizabeth II which is an exclusive design of the Pobjoy Mint. The year of issue and authority are placed within the legend around the Queen’s portrait.

Denom.MetalWeightDiameterQualityMaximum Mintage
CrownTitanium10 g36.1 mmBrilliant Unc.7,500
CrownCupro-nickel28.2 g38.6 mmBrilliant Unc.10,000
Crown.925 Silver28.2 g38.6 mmProof2,000




The sterling silver coins are encapsulated and presented in a custom, branded case along with a certificate of authenticity. The titanium coins are shipped encapsulated in an acrylic capsule for protection and housed in a custom branded red presentation case with a certificate of authenticity. As titanium reacts differently with every strike, each sapphire-tinted coronation anniversary coin is technically different from each other and varies slightly in colour. There is also a lined effect that is present on the coins which is unique to this metal. The cupro-nickel examples are presented in a branded cloth protective pouch. For additional information on these and other coins issued by the treasury of the Falkland Islands, please visit the website of the Pobjoy Mint.

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Poland: Great Polish economist Fryderyk Skarbek features on latest silver collector coin

Background image by Fryderyk Skarbek.

The National Bank of Poland have issued (14th April) new collector coins which are minted in tribute to one of the country’s more noted economists, Fryderyk Skarbek (1792–1866), who is remembered for his scientific work in the field of economics as well as in other fields of art and literature. Fryderyk Florian Skarbek was a thinker with a variety of achievements but his rich creative output also includes novels, dramas, poems, translations, historical works, and landscape paintings.

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The coins are produced by the Mint of Poland at their facilities in Warsaw on behalf of the National Bank and are designed by Sebastian Mikołajczak. The obverse design of the coin depicts an open book, on which is the title of one of the works of Fryderyk Skarbek, The National Economy, along with the issuing authority, the denomination of the coin, 10 ZŁ, and the year of issue.

The reverse carries a portrait of Fryderyk Skarbek, and to his left, on a page of the book, is the author’s definition of the “national economy.” Below there are the dates of birth and death of Fryderyk Skarbek.

Denom.MetalWeightDiameterQualityMaximum Mintage
10  zlotych.925 Silver14.1 g32 mmProof15,000




The second coin in this annual series is available on the 24th April and is encapsulated and presented in a custom-branded National Bank of Poland case along with a certificate of authenticity. For additional information on these and other coins issued by the National Bank of Poland, please visit their website.

A Man for All Seasons — Economist Fryderyk Skarbek (1792—1866)

Fryderyk Skarbek (1837), by Adolf Piwarski.

Skarbek was born on the 15th February 1792, into an old noble family which possessed the Abdank coat-of-arms whose history in the country originated from the wealthier families and itinerant knights from abroad seeking their fortune within the Polish—Lithuanian Commonwealth. As a young man he was educated under the supervision of Nicolas Chopin, the father of Frédéric Chopin, and during his secondary education, he was taught by the famous linguist Samuel Bogumił Linde, whom he helped in the work of producing the dictionary of the Polish language. Skarbek next went to study in France and after two years he returned to his homeland, where, for a dozen or so years, he lectured political economy at the University of Warsaw.

During his lifetime, the Polish scholar held many public offices. Skarbek gave economic science a national hue, which is why he is also called the father of Polish economics. In his works he brought to the foreground the concept of the nation, binding together all the phenomena related to the national economy. Skarbek saw the conditions for development and social welfare in the existence of a broad group of medium-sized owners. In turn, in order to eliminate the poverty of peasants and the misery of workers, he postulated transforming them into a multitude of small entrepreneurs. He rejected the concept of homo oeconomicus, or economic man, which is the concept in many economic theories portraying humans as consistently rational and narrowly self-interested agents who usually pursue their subjectively-defined ends optimally. Skarbek believed in the individual’s aspirations to achieve not only material goals but also spiritual and social ones.

During his lifetime and through his teachings, Skarbek stressed the importance of private property, which he argued better serves the flourishing of society than state interventionism and bureaucracy. He postulated the development of industry, as well as measures aimed at reducing the public debt and a reduction of fiscal burdens. The scholar stressed the need to raise capital through private savings and stressed the indispensability of balanced growth of all sectors of the economy.

Aside from his expertise in the field of economics, Skarbek was very active in social activities and charity work which included the support of the establishment of savings banks for workers and the construction of shelters for the homeless and poor. Skarbek retired in 1858 and returned to scholarly and literary work. He died on the 25th September 1866, and was survived by his second wife Pelagia Rutkowska, his three sons, and one daughter.

Among the major works of this eminent Polish economist are his magnum opus General Principles of the Science of the National Economy, a two-volume textbook entitled The National Economy, a historical work entitled The History of the Duchy of Warsaw, and the novel The Memoirs of Seglas.

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South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands: New crown coin celebrates historic 65th anniversary of Her Majesty’s coronation

The government and treasury of the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands have issued (17th April) new crown coins in celebration of the coronation of the United Kingdom’s longest-serving sovereign to date, Queen Elizabeth II, who marked the 65th (or Sapphire Jubilee) of her reign on the 6th February 2017.

After acceding to the throne in February 1952 following the death of her father, King George VI, Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation was held on the 2nd June 1953, at Westminster Abbey. Coronations have been held at Westminster Abbey for 900 years and Her Majesty was the sixth Queen to have been crowned there. The service was conducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury, a duty which has been undertaken since the conquest of William the Conqueror in 1066. The Coronation service itself fell into six parts: The recognition, the oath, the anointing, the investiture (which includes the crowning), the enthronement, and the homage. The Queen and HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, were driven from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey in the Gold State Coach which was pulled by eight grey gelding horses whose names were Cunningham, Tovey, Noah, Tedder, Eisenhower, Snow White, Tipperary, and McCreery. The Gold State Coach has been used at the coronation of every British monarch since George VI, who himself went to his coronation in 1821 after the death of his father George III, who was at that time the country’s longest-serving sovereign for 59 years. The return route was designed so that the procession could be seen by as many people in London as possible and took the 16,000 participants two hours to complete. Designed by William Chambers and made by the coachmaker Samuel Butler, the coach features three cherubs on the roof representing England, Ireland, and Scotland — which support the imperial crown.

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It is these three cherubs depicted in beautiful detail on the new coins which are produced by the Pobjoy Mint at their facilities in Surrey. The commemorative years 1953 and 2018, along with the denomination of TWO POUNDS, are placed below the primary design.

The obverse includes an effigy of HM Queen Elizabeth II, which is an exclusive design to the Pobjoy Mint. The year of issue and authority are placed within the legend around the Queen’s portrait.

Denom.

Metal

WeightDiameterQuality

Maximum Mintage

Two pounds

Cupro-nickel

28.2 g38.6 mmBrilliant Unc.

10,000

Two pounds

.925 Silver

28.2 g38.6 mmProof

2,000





The sterling silver coins are encapsulated and presented in a custom, branded case along with a certificate of authenticity. The cupro-nickel examples are presented in a branded cloth protective pouch. For additional information on these and other coins issued by the treasury of the South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands, please visit the website of the Pobjoy Mint.

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Canada: Five coin silver set highlights the legacy of the dime

The Royal Canadian Mint have compiled a new set of silver coins which remember the history and legacy of the dime, or 10-cent coin, which has been in circulation in Canada since confederation in 1867 and previously throughout the various colonies and territories of British North America.

Canadians know their coin began circulating from 1858, nine years before Canadian Confederation became official in 1867, and had a very similar reverse design which continued until 1936, or the last year of reign of HM King George V. The design was created by L.C. Wyon which depicted crossed maple boughs topped by St. Edward’s Crown. This familiar design became a fixture on all Canadian 10-cent coins as well as the five-cent silver, 25, and 50-cent coins. With the accession of King George VI in 1936, a decision to re-design the reverse sides of Canadian coinage, as well as the obverse, was undertaken. As new circulation designs were proposed, a mountain goat was among the ideas considered for the 10-cent denomination but ultimately, the decision was made to feature Emanuel Hahn’s now-famous depiction of the bluenose schooner. The face value was originally intended to take up two lines with “10” above “CENTS,” but in the end, the face value was engraved as a single line, as it appears today. With the centennial anniversary of Canadian confederation, which occurred in 1967, the Royal Canadian Mint decided to issue a special one-year-only series of circulation coinage with commemorative reverse designs. The 10-cent coin saw the depiction of a mackerel, created by Alex Colville, whose six designs in total have become firm favourites ever since their issue now more than 50 years ago.

In 2001, The Royal Canadian Mint issued a 10-cent coin which was dedicated to the international year of the volunteer which was unveiled by His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales during an official visit to Canada. The reverse side was created by Royal Canadian Mint engravers of whom many are still with the RCM. The most recent change to the reverse of the 10-cent coin came just last year when Canada observed 150 years of confederation and, as was done in 1967, a special dime was issued with a commemorative design. The coin was part of the “My Canada, My Inspiration” series and depicted a design entitled “Wings of Peace.”

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1858 — 1936 Series Re-Created, Two-Ounce Coin: The exceptionally rare 1936 dot 10-cent coin features W. H. J. Blakemore’s modified version of an original design by L.C. Wyon. A small dot beneath the tied ribbon is the identifying mark of a coin struck with the old obverse during the transition from the reign of King George V to King George VI. The obverse features the effigy of King George V by Sir E. B. Mackennal.

1936 — Present Series Re-Created, Two-Ounce Coin: Chosen is the 1947 maple leaf 10-cent coin. The reverse features Emanuel Hahn’s depiction of the famous Nova Scotia schooner, Bluenose, under sail. On the obverse, the effigy of King George VI by T. H. Paget includes the royal title GEORGIVS VI D:G: REX ET IND: IMP. The legend denotes that the king was also emperor of India, which became outdated once India gained its independence on August 15, 1947. Included in this modern-day tribute is the small maple leaf that was added next to the year, to denote coins struck with the old obverse while the Royal Canadian Mint awaited new master tooling.

1967 Centennial Commemorative, One-Ounce Coin: This is the 1967 centennial 10-cent coin which features the beloved reverse design by Alex Colville. The image of a mackerel pays tribute to Canada’s coast and represents the idea of continuity. Instead of the denticles seen on previous designs, round beads encircle the reverse and obverse.

2001 International Year of the Volunteer Commemorative, One-Ounce Coin: Created by Royal Canadian Mint engravers, the reverse of this 10-cent coin depicts a curving legend, YEAR OF VOLUNTEERS ANNÉE DES BÉNÉVOLES, which separates the side-profile view of marching mothers and the sun below, whose rays symbolize a volunteer’s enlightening effect on their community. The obverse features the effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Dora de Pédery-Hunt which was used on Canadian coinage from 1987 until 2002.

2018 150 Years of Canadian Confederation Anniversary, One-Ounce Coin: The Wings of Peace is the most recent commemorative issue of the 10-cent coin. As part of the “My Canada, My Inspiration” collection features a reverse design by Amy Choi of Calgary, Alberta. The design highlights Canada’s reputation as a peacekeeping nation. And instead of a traditional olive branch, the stylised dove clutches a maple leaf that stands as a symbol of hope, peace, and good faith. The obverse features the CANADA 150 logo and the effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II by Susanna Blunt which has been in use on Canada’s coinage since 2003.

Denom.

Metal

WeightDiameterQuality

Maximum Mintage

10 cents x 2

.999 Silver

62.6 g54 mm

Proof with selective plating

3,000

 

10 cents x 3

.999 Silver

31.3 g38 mm

Proof with selective plating




This five-coin set is a retrospective look at the designs that have adorned Canada’s smallest-sized circulation coins. Paired with the original obverse, each selectively gold-plated coin is crafted from pure silver and are issued as three crown and two double-crown-sized coins. The set is housed in a custom wood crafted case and is accompanied by a serialised certificate of authenticity. For additional information on these and other coins available from the Royal Canadian Mint, please visit their website.

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British Antarctic Territory: New coins issued in tribute to explorer Robert Scott

The government and treasury of the British Antarctic Territory have issued (1st March) new commemorative crown coins which are minted in remembrance the 150th anniversary of the birth of one of the United Kingdom’s most celebrated Arctic explorers. Robert Falcon Scott is most remembered as the head of the exploration of the Antarctic continent from 1901 to 1904, which managed to reach further south than anyone before them, and as a result, Scott returned to Britain a national hero.

Captain Robert Falcon Scott was born in Plymouth, Devon, on the 6th June 1868. He was a navy officer most famous for his explorations of the Antarctic regions. His first expedition from 1901 to 1904 was upon the RSS Discovery, which actually features in the design of the Polar Medal, awarded by the sovereign of the United Kingdom in recognition for the extreme human endeavour in the Arctic and Antarctic. The expedition was difficult and the crew had very little specialised equipment to help with the weather conditions. One of the objectives of the expedition was to explore, hence the crew pushed south towards the pole which resulted in the discovery of the Polar Plateau. At the end of the expedition, the Discovery became trapped in the ice and explosives had to be used to free it.

After Ernest Shackleton returned from an expedition where he almost reached the South Pole, Scott was keen to plan a second expedition to try and be the first to reach it. This lead to Scott’s 1910 to 1912 expedition on the ship, Terra Nova, in order to claim the Pole in the name of Great Britain. On the 1st March 1911, Scott began the long and ill-fated journey to the South Pole. During the journey support teams with horses and dogs turned back at set points in order to give Scott and four other men the best chance of reaching the Pole. On the 17th January 1912, they reached the Pole only to find that they had been beaten to their final destination as the Norwegian explorer, Roald Amundsen, had beaten them by five weeks. The defeated men began the long 800-mile journey back to meet the rest of the crew and encountered unexpected and extreme weather conditions. Scott’s companion Lawrence Oates’ toes had become frostbitten and he voluntarily left the tent and walked to his death. This deed is regarded as an act of self-sacrifice since he was aware that his ill health was compromising his three companions’ chances of survival, so he chose certain death. Scott then walked a further 20 miles where he made camp for the last time, but the weather prevented them from pushing any further. Sadly and tragically, they slowly ran out of supplies and perished with Scott’s last diary entry reading “For God’s sake look after our people.” The explorers were found eight months later by a rescue detail who found the men just 12 miles from the nearest supply hut and were buried where they perished.

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The coins are produced by the Pobjoy Mint, at their facilities in Surrey, on behalf of the treasury of the British Antarctic Territory and include both cupro-nickel and sterling silver examples. The reverse of the coin features an artist’s impression of the Polar Medal that was inaugurated for members of Captain Scott’s first and incredibly arduous expedition to Antarctica in 1904. The design was created by Ernest Gillick and shows the RRS Discovery, with a sledding party in the foreground. Robert Falcon Scott’s name, year of birth, and death are incorporated into the design.

The obverse features an effigy of HM Queen Elizabeth II, which is an exclusive design of the Pobjoy Mint. The legend around the Queen’s effigy includes the issuing authority of the BRITISH ANTARCTIC TERRITORY and the year of issue, 2018.

Denom.

Metal

WeightDiameterQuality

Maximum Mintage

Two pounds

Cupro-nickel

28.2 g38.6 mmBrilliant Unc.

10,000

Two pounds

.925 Silver28.2 g38.6 mmProof

2,000




The sterling silver coins are encapsulated and housed in a custom-branded red presentation box along with a certificate of authenticity. The Brilliant Uncirculated cupro-nickel coin is presented in a soft cloth pouch. For additional information on this coin and others issued by the British Antarctic Territory, please visit the website of the Pobjoy Mint.

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