The following Q&A is excerpted from Clifford Mishler’s Coins: Questions & Answers Q: I have a coin which is dated 1863, has an Indian head on the obverse, and is the same size as our current one-cent piece, but on the reverse it states NOT ONE CENT. ...
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Q&A: I have a coin which is dated 1863, has an Indian head on the obverse. Can you tell me what kind of a coin this is? and more...

Q&A: I have a coin which is dated 1863, has an Indian head on the obverse. Can you tell me what kind of a coin this is?

1888 Indian cent. MS-66 RD (PCGS). CAC.

The following Q&A is excerpted from Clifford Mishler’s Coins: Questions & Answers

Q: I have a coin which is dated 1863, has an Indian head on the obverse, and is the same size as our current one-cent piece, but on the reverse it states NOT ONE CENT. Can you tell me what kind of a coin this is?

A: Your “coin” quite possibly served as such, but is actually a privately issued patriotic Civil War token. These were issued by merchants during a severe coin shortage during Civil War days to provide a small coin for everyday transactions. Many were imitations of the Indian Head cent which had at the time only recently been introduced (1859) into circulation; others bore representations of such traditional devices as the Liberty Head; U.S. shield, flag, and eagle; and portraits of the founding fathers. Most were made of copper; other compositions were brass, zinc, nickel, copper-nickel, and lead. They were finally outlawed by...

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Heritage Auctions’ $103.5 million sale of Russian journalist’s Nobel Prize medal tops all numismatic records

All proceeds from the record-shattering sale go toward UNICEF’s humanitarian response to the war in Ukraine and affected regions

Dallas, Texas (June 29, 2022) — On June 20, Heritage Auctions sold the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize medal awarded to independent Russian journalist and Novaya Gazeta editor-in-chief, Dmitry Muratov, for $103.5 million. That is the highest price, by far, ever paid for a Nobel medal — or a numismatic treasure of any kind.

The medal was sold to an anonymous buyer during a live auction held at the Times Center in Manhattan and broadcast around the world. Proceeds raised from the auction will support UNICEF’s humanitarian response to the war in Ukraine and affected regions. Heritage Auctions donated its efforts to bring worldwide attention to Muratov’s desire to aid those impacted by the war.

Muratov announced on March 22 that he intended to auction his medal with all proceeds going to support humanitarian relief efforts for Ukrainian child refugees and...

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United Kingdom: Ultimate coin in popular “Innovation in Science” series dedicated to genius mathematician Alan Turing

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The Royal Mint released (4th July) new precious metal and cupro-nickel commemorative 50-pence coins which complete the popular six-coin series entitled “Innovation in Science,” focusing on the British men and women whose contribution to science was significant. The collector series included some of history’s greatest scientific minds including Charles Babbage, John Logie Baird, Rosalind Franklin, Stephen Hawking, as well as the single discovery of insulin. The last coin features the genius and achievements of Alan Turing (1912–1954), considered the “father of computing.” Turing is also widely credited with his pioneering research of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence as we understand it today. However, it is Turing’s most sensational accomplishments, the recreation of the machine and process which deciphered the Third Reich’s Enigma code, that he is most remembered for. 

The seven-sided coins are designed by...

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U.S. Mint sales report: Week ending June 26, 2022

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This U.S. Mint numismatic sales report covers the week ending June 26, 2022. The Mint’s best-selling product last week was the 2022-S U.S. Mint Silver Proof Set (22RH), which sold 173,861 units. In second place was the 2022-S U.S. Mint Proof Set (22RG) with 4,525 sold. The third best-selling item last week was the 2022-W one-ounce American Silver Eagle $1 Uncirculated coin (22EG), with 2,626 individual units sold. It’s followed by the 2022-W National Purple Heart Hall of Honor $1 silver Proof coin (22CC), with 1,208 sold; and the 2022-S American Innovation $1 Proof Set (22GA), with 1,059 sold.

Last week saw a downward adjustment of -60 for the 2022-W American Gold Eagle Proof Four-Coin Set (22EF), -14 for the 2022-W 1/4-ounce American Gold Eagle $10 Proof coin (22ED), -9 for the 2022 Kennedy Half Dollar, Two-Roll Set (P&D) (22KB), -8 for the 2022-W one-ounce American Gold Eagle $50 Proof coin (22EB), and -4 for the 2022-W 1/10-ounce American Gold Eagle $5...

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Caution! Hundreds of websites selling counterfeit gold and silver coins

Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation warns of fake “precious metal” and “rare coins” offered online, and helps a Texas investor who became an unsuspecting victim

(Temecula, California) June 30, 2022 — Looking to buy gold and silver, “Oliver,” an investor in Texas, responded to advertisements on Facebook from two companies that touted exceptionally low “introductory offer” prices for silver and gold bullion coins. He paid $1,000 and now is trying to get his money back because the “gold coin” and all 50 “silver coins” he received are counterfeits apparently made in China, according to the non-profit Anti-Counterfeiting Educational Foundation (ACEF).

“I started suspecting they were not genuine when tracking information for my orders was in Chinese,” said Oliver. “That was a red flag. I also saw the same advertisement online with the same format and same pricing but with different company names. When I received the orders, I thought I had gotten...

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